Covington blasts ‘pathetic’ Woodley, shares details of sparring sessions with ‘diva’ UFC champ

Colby Covington had some harsh words for UFC champ Tyron Woodley, who he doesn’t consider a teammate anymore.

While Tyron Woodley spends most of his training camps at Roufusport nowadays, he still considers himself part of American Top Team. The UFC welterweight champion still trains there from time to time, and has ATT coaches like Din Thomas in his corner through everything.

If you ask his former sparring partner in Colby Covington though, he’d say otherwise. According to the fellow UFC welterweight, they’re not teammates anymore. In fact, he sees Woodley as an enemy.

“He’s not my teammate. What are you taking about? He trains at Duke Roufus,” Covington told Submission radio. “He left American Top Team three, four years ago and he’s been training most of his time at Duke Roufus, so I don’t consider that guy a teammate.

“We don’t train together anymore. We used to back in the day,” he said. “Yeah, he’ll come to American Top Team and show face cause he’s trying to keep it cool here. He knows there’s a lot of young up-and-coming studs like me and Jorge (Masvidal) who he does not want to be in that octagon with. So I don’t consider that my teammate. He’s an enemy now. Public enemy number one.”

Covington also questioned Woodley’s heart, and criticized him for not being a “true fighter.”

“He’s just mentally weak, man,” he said. “In the wrestling world he’s mentally weak, he’s a breaker. That’s what we call it. He breaks. Mentally, he’s not there, man. He’s an explosive, athletic athlete, but he’s not a fighter, a true fighter. He’s not a warrior. And it showed in wrestling, you know, it showed in college, it shows in the training room.

“He doesn’t like to go hard, he doesn’t like to grind with the guys cause he can’t do that anymore. He’s older, his body’s breaking down and he doesn’t have a cardio gas tank. That’s why you don’t see him wrestle really in fights anymore.”

He even went further, sharing his version of what happened during their private training sessions, and calling him a “diva.”

“I just remember (our sparring sessions) being easy. I was like, dude, this guy is so pathetic,” he said. “He doesn’t like it tough. He doesn’t like things hard. He doesn’t like relentless pressure on him. When he feels pressure, he breaks. Just sparring with him, you know, all I had to do is throw a combination and then just fucking get on the inside with him, push him against the cage and literally he’d be broken within five to seven minutes.

“The guy, he just doesn’t like it tough, man – ‘I’m a diva, I’m the UFC champ, I’m doing movies, I’m a pretty boy like this and that.’ He’s not a real fighter, man. I’m telling you, he’s gonna get exposed soon, I promise you that.

“You know, it wasn’t competitive,” he continued. “Like, when we were on the ground grappling, his submission defence is real bad, I’d catch him in submissions. When we wrestled, I took him down pretty easy. He couldn’t take me down. When we sparred, I just put the pressure on him and got on the inside and he hated that. He just hated it when he just had to make those big muscles have to work. Because you need oxygen to get those muscles to work and when you get those muscles tired, he falls over and breaks. So it wasn’t very competitive.”

Covington is currently the #9 ranked welterweight. He predicts that Maia will submit Woodley at UFC 214, but at the same time, also hopes to get a title bout with his former sparring partner.

“I’m very excited if I can get that match-up in the near future. I will be very confident, and I’m sure the odds makers will probably make me the favourite too.”

Colby Covington had some harsh words for UFC champ Tyron Woodley, who he doesn’t consider a teammate anymore.

While Tyron Woodley spends most of his training camps at Roufusport nowadays, he still considers himself part of American Top Team. The UFC welterweight champion still trains there from time to time, and has ATT coaches like Din Thomas in his corner through everything.

If you ask his former sparring partner in Colby Covington though, he’d say otherwise. According to the fellow UFC welterweight, they’re not teammates anymore. In fact, he sees Woodley as an enemy.

“He’s not my teammate. What are you taking about? He trains at Duke Roufus,” Covington told Submission radio. “He left American Top Team three, four years ago and he’s been training most of his time at Duke Roufus, so I don’t consider that guy a teammate.

“We don’t train together anymore. We used to back in the day,” he said. “Yeah, he’ll come to American Top Team and show face cause he’s trying to keep it cool here. He knows there’s a lot of young up-and-coming studs like me and Jorge (Masvidal) who he does not want to be in that octagon with. So I don’t consider that my teammate. He’s an enemy now. Public enemy number one.”

Covington also questioned Woodley’s heart, and criticized him for not being a “true fighter.”

“He’s just mentally weak, man,” he said. “In the wrestling world he’s mentally weak, he’s a breaker. That’s what we call it. He breaks. Mentally, he’s not there, man. He’s an explosive, athletic athlete, but he’s not a fighter, a true fighter. He’s not a warrior. And it showed in wrestling, you know, it showed in college, it shows in the training room.

“He doesn’t like to go hard, he doesn’t like to grind with the guys cause he can’t do that anymore. He’s older, his body’s breaking down and he doesn’t have a cardio gas tank. That’s why you don’t see him wrestle really in fights anymore.”

He even went further, sharing his version of what happened during their private training sessions, and calling him a “diva.”

“I just remember (our sparring sessions) being easy. I was like, dude, this guy is so pathetic,” he said. “He doesn’t like it tough. He doesn’t like things hard. He doesn’t like relentless pressure on him. When he feels pressure, he breaks. Just sparring with him, you know, all I had to do is throw a combination and then just fucking get on the inside with him, push him against the cage and literally he’d be broken within five to seven minutes.

“The guy, he just doesn’t like it tough, man – ‘I’m a diva, I’m the UFC champ, I’m doing movies, I’m a pretty boy like this and that.’ He’s not a real fighter, man. I’m telling you, he’s gonna get exposed soon, I promise you that.

“You know, it wasn’t competitive,” he continued. “Like, when we were on the ground grappling, his submission defence is real bad, I’d catch him in submissions. When we wrestled, I took him down pretty easy. He couldn’t take me down. When we sparred, I just put the pressure on him and got on the inside and he hated that. He just hated it when he just had to make those big muscles have to work. Because you need oxygen to get those muscles to work and when you get those muscles tired, he falls over and breaks. So it wasn’t very competitive.”

Covington is currently the #9 ranked welterweight. He predicts that Maia will submit Woodley at UFC 214, but at the same time, also hopes to get a title bout with his former sparring partner.

“I’m very excited if I can get that match-up in the near future. I will be very confident, and I’m sure the odds makers will probably make me the favourite too.”

Video: Malignaggi unsure if Conor McGregor still wants to spar him to prepare for Floyd Mayweather

Pauli Malignaggi says he has yet to hear back again from Conor McGregor about bringing him in as a sparring partner.

Earlier in the month, news broke that Conor McGregor would be bringing in former Paulie Malignaggi as a sparring partner as he prepares for Floyd Mayweather. The two-division boxing champ has gone on record to say that he has accepted the offer. Malignaggi says despite past smack talk through the media, he is looking forward to being a “team player” and to help the UFC champion get better.

McGregor also said during the start of his world press tour that Malignaggi will “answer to what he’s been saying” about him, and is looking forward to having a “knock in the gym” when they spar.

Just this past weekend though, Malignaggi said he has yet to hear back from the McGregor camp again, and isn’t sure if it pushes through.

“I havent done any work with Conor,” Malignaggi told Fight Hub. “They’ve done alot of talking as far as bringing me in but I’m not sure if they will. It’s up to them really, it’s not up to me.

“If they wanna bring me in, we’ve spoken. If they do they do. If they don’t, it doesnt matter, I’ll be there ringside either way,” he said. “A fight of this magnitude, you hope both guys are being prepared the best. I wish both guys the best. Hopefully it’ll be entertaining”

Malignaggi will still be part of the massive event regardless, as he will also be working as a commentator for Showtime.

Former Pacquiao opponent Jessie Vargas also recently claimed that McGregor “got knocked out in sparring already.”

Pauli Malignaggi says he has yet to hear back again from Conor McGregor about bringing him in as a sparring partner.

Earlier in the month, news broke that Conor McGregor would be bringing in former Paulie Malignaggi as a sparring partner as he prepares for Floyd Mayweather. The two-division boxing champ has gone on record to say that he has accepted the offer. Malignaggi says despite past smack talk through the media, he is looking forward to being a “team player” and to help the UFC champion get better.

McGregor also said during the start of his world press tour that Malignaggi will “answer to what he’s been saying” about him, and is looking forward to having a “knock in the gym” when they spar.

Just this past weekend though, Malignaggi said he has yet to hear back from the McGregor camp again, and isn’t sure if it pushes through.

“I havent done any work with Conor,” Malignaggi told Fight Hub. “They’ve done alot of talking as far as bringing me in but I’m not sure if they will. It’s up to them really, it’s not up to me.

“If they wanna bring me in, we’ve spoken. If they do they do. If they don’t, it doesnt matter, I’ll be there ringside either way,” he said. “A fight of this magnitude, you hope both guys are being prepared the best. I wish both guys the best. Hopefully it’ll be entertaining”

Malignaggi will still be part of the massive event regardless, as he will also be working as a commentator for Showtime.

Former Pacquiao opponent Jessie Vargas also recently claimed that McGregor “got knocked out in sparring already.”

Video: Road FC 40: $1 million lightweight tournament live stream and discussion

Watch Road FC 40 which will host the opening round of their $1 million lightweight tournament

Road FC 40 will be a stacked card, that debuts the promotion’s $1 million lightweight tournament filled with UFC vets and various champions from numerous organizations. It is also topped off by an openweight championship bout between K-1 legend Mighty Mo and Kang Dong-Kuk.

Also featured are UFC vet Riki Fukuda and top Japanese boxer Raika Emiko who will be on separate bouts on the prelims.

You can watch the entire card live and free on YouTube starting 12 midnight ET for prelims, and 2 a.m. ET for the main card.

Road FC 40 Main Card (2:00 a.m. ET)

Openweight Championship

Mighty Mo vs. Kang Dong-Kuk

Lightweight Tournament Opening Round

Shinji Sasaki VS Amartuvshin Khuukhenkhuu

Tom Santos vs Nam Yui-Chul

Ronys Torres vs Elnur Agaev

Shimoishi Kota vs Park Dae-Sung

Toninho Furia vs Nandin-Erdene

Kim Chang-Hyun vs Mansour Barnaoui

Shamil Zavurov vs Leo Kuntz

Baoyincang vs Red Romero

Prelims (12:00 midnight ET)

Riki 
Fukuda vs Kim Hoon

Raika Emiko vs Kim Hae-In

Jung Doo-Jae vs Alexander Merezhko [LW Tournament Reserve Match]

Lee Hyung-Seok vs Park Hae-Jin [LW Tournament Reserve Match]

Lim Dong-Hwan vs. Kim Ji-Hoon

Watch Road FC 40 which will host the opening round of their $1 million lightweight tournament

Road FC 40 will be a stacked card, that debuts the promotion’s $1 million lightweight tournament filled with UFC vets and various champions from numerous organizations. It is also topped off by an openweight championship bout between K-1 legend Mighty Mo and Kang Dong-Kuk.

Also featured are UFC vet Riki Fukuda and top Japanese boxer Raika Emiko who will be on separate bouts on the prelims.

You can watch the entire card live and free on YouTube starting 12 midnight ET for prelims, and 2 a.m. ET for the main card.

Road FC 40 Main Card (2:00 a.m. ET)

Openweight Championship

Mighty Mo vs. Kang Dong-Kuk

Lightweight Tournament Opening Round

Shinji Sasaki VS Amartuvshin Khuukhenkhuu

Tom Santos vs Nam Yui-Chul

Ronys Torres vs Elnur Agaev

Shimoishi Kota vs Park Dae-Sung

Toninho Furia vs Nandin-Erdene

Kim Chang-Hyun vs Mansour Barnaoui

Shamil Zavurov vs Leo Kuntz

Baoyincang vs Red Romero

Prelims (12:00 midnight ET)

Riki ?Fukuda vs Kim Hoon

Raika Emiko vs Kim Hae-In

Jung Doo-Jae vs Alexander Merezhko [LW Tournament Reserve Match]

Lee Hyung-Seok vs Park Hae-Jin [LW Tournament Reserve Match]

Lim Dong-Hwan vs. Kim Ji-Hoon

Resurgence in Road FC: Mighty Mo is making up for lost time in a young man’s sport

Former K-1 Grand Prix champion Mighty Mo Siliga opens up to Bloody Elbow about battling personal issues — and father time — en route to a Road FC title reign at 46 years of age.

During the height of K-1, Mighty Mo fought the elite kickboxers in the planet and established himself among the best in combat sports. After he debuted in Japan, the American-Samoan heavyweight went on to win multiple K-1 Grand Prix tournaments, and also did well during the few times he crossed over to mixed martial arts.

After gaining success and fan fare early in his career, Mo eventually hit a rough patch both in his personal and professional life. He had understandable losses to legends and champion fighters such as Semmy Schilt, Josh Barnett and Kyotaro, but then he continued to struggle for years in the kickboxing circuit.

“Those were times that I was under the water, and I didn’t realize it,” Mighty Mo told Bloody Elbow.

For years, the hard-hitting heavyweight struggled with deep personal issues relating to family members. It took time away from training, led him to vices and away from a healthy lifestyle. The emotional stress took such a huge toll, that fighting just wasn’t the main focus anymore.

“I was dealing with too many family issues. When you get up there, people tend to take advantage of you a lot. I was dealing with all those emotional issues, and I didn’t know how to deal with it,” he explained. “You make it to the top, and so-called ‘family’ takes advantage of you.

“I had to go through a lot of issues in my life. I never really had a mentor to help and point me to do this, stay away from the family stuff, focus on your career. I didn’t have that type of person.”

These problems kept him from having the proper condition and mindset to compete at a high level, but for a stretch, he still stepped in the ring to disastrous results.

“I was just taking my youth for granted,” Mo said about how he fought on without the same focus and training, knowing he had power and athleticism to fall back on. “Being young, you never think things would go away, but things do go away. If you don’t take care of it, your blessings will diminish.”

While he struggled in kickboxing, Mo somehow still managed to do okay in his stint with Bellator through all of this. He went 3-1 in the promotion, with his only loss being against Alexander Volkov, a former M-1 champ who is currently undefeated in the UFC.

He was still winning MMA bouts, but he knew something just wasn’t right with him. Eventually, the heavyweight decided that enough is enough, and he had to focus on getting healthy and getting both his body and mind in the right place.

“There was a point where I’m looking at my kids, and why I started fighting for them,” Mo said about the turning point in his life. “To be a provider, and that this is what I love doing. I just realized that my health isn’t where it was supposed to be, because I felt it.”

After looking to clear his mind from all the emotional stress, Mo also took care of his body and went back to a healthy lifestyle. He also enlisted the services of a doctor to handle his nutrition and run tests.

“I had to get me a doctor to help me realize that my chemical balances aren’t on point,” he explained. “A nutritionist, and health doctor, to make sure all your vitamins, blood and chemistry is where it’s supposed to be. Not way down here, or way up here — either way you’re going to kill yourself. It’s got to be balanced, and those things weren’t at all… at all.

“He helped me put everything in the right place for it, where it is supposed to be to compete at this level.”

The results of this lifestyle change have been evident. During the last two years, Mo found an unlikely career resurgence through his 40’s as he was victorious in 5 straight MMA bouts. Not only did he win an open weight tournament with Korea-based promotion Road FC, he also won and defended the promotion’s title in the process.

 Road FC

“It’s being way more focused. I matured as I was going along,” he said. “When I was in K-1, I was still young — I was young to the game. I never understood how everything was balanced out, and where (my health, and chemistry) was needed to be. I also didn’t know how to deal with emotional issues, and things of that sort.

“So when I was in K-1, everything was just relying more on natural and raw talent. Now, I’m more seasoned, more experienced. Yes, I’m a little older, but more experienced.”

While many just attributed the previous struggles to age catching up to him, Mo says that clearly wasn’t the case. Now that he’s put his problems behind him, his confidence has skyrocketed and he believes this is his time to finally reach his potential and perform like he always should have.

“I focus on my health to the T,” he said. “I hit harder now, even more than when I was younger. Technique, timing, talent, speed, power, everything (is now coming together).

“Now, I feel like I’m almost at a hundred percent. Even though I’m the champion now, I don’t feel like I’m totally at a 100% yet. I know I’m getting better. As you can see in my fights, I’m finishing off these guys quick, and my power and speed is off the roof.”

Many of his colleagues and former rivals are either long retired, or fighting as shells of themselves. Mo knows that fighting is a young man’s sport, so winning a tournament and a championship this late in his career is a testament to his longevity.

While he admits to having to deal with more aches and pains in training camp these days, he says he feels much better now that he can focus and train smarter.

“To tell you the truth, I don’t even think about my age, or my opponent’s. It doesn’t calculate in my head. ‘This guy is younger’ – it doesn’t even matter. To me, I think I’m a young guy. I don’t know why, but I move and I feel like a young guy.

“But for me to say it, I’ve got to be able to prove it, and I’ve proven to the world what I can do. To me when people are ‘you’re old, you’re old’ – So? What’s the problem? I’m winning.”

“This just shows who the real champions are, who the real warriors are,” he says about other fighters from his era. “I’m not taking anything away from them, but I feel like I was meant for this. (My longevity) just makes me feel like I was blessed with the skills and power and speed.”

Mo defends his belt for the second time at Road FC 40 on Saturday night. He says he only has two fights remaining on his contract, but retirement isn’t on the table just yet. If things go as planned, he’ll try and achieve the bigger things that eluded him on his younger years.

“I’m going to keep going until I’m satisfied, and I don’t even feel satisfied,” he exclaimed. “You know how it is when you feel you didn’t accomplish some of the things you know could’ve accomplished when you were on top? Because of the issues that I went through in my life, especially with my family — that held me back.

“It’s like climbing a hill. You don’t want to leave your family, so you’re throwing them on your back. You’re climbing, but if someone falls, you’ve got to climb back down and pick them back up. Then you’ll climb again. That’s the story of my life,” he shared. “I kept going back down, instead of going all the way up there and throwing a rope down and pulling them up. That’s what I should’ve done, but my life, and my career, this is what I was doing.

“I was trying to climb and pull my family, the ones that didn’t want to – I would have to go back down and pick them up. That’s what it was like.

“I feel like I got cheated in my career because I focused too much on them, when they did not care. They just took, took, took, and didn’t care. I was all worried, and I was all hurt, and my feelings — but I was thinking that I’ve got to save them.”

 Road FC
Mo says winning the trilogy against fellow K-1 GP winner Hong Man Choi was yet another statement that he’s “back on point.”

While there naturally are ‘what ifs’ and thoughts on how different his career would’ve been without them, Mo knows those challenging years shaped him to be the man he is today. It led to him being a champion at Road FC, and he plans to continue proving himself both inside and outside of the cage.

“Big time, I wish I would’ve done all this before,” he said. “But it also showed me that I am strong enough to come back from that type of issue, and be here today. That’s one of the things I’ve learned. That’s the true meaning of my name. Mighty Mo is who I am, and I’m living up to that name.

“My goal is just to be at the highest level at the game, to seek and destroy every heavyweight that’s out there at this moment, at any organization. I feel I’m the baddest right now. This is the one reason why I never retired, because I felt I never gave it my 100%.

“As you can see, in Road FC, I’m destroying everybody,” he said. “I know that I can tell you whatever I want to, but my actions speak louder than my words. I want to show you that I’m the best heavyweight in the world.”

Former K-1 Grand Prix champion Mighty Mo Siliga opens up to Bloody Elbow about battling personal issues — and father time — en route to a Road FC title reign at 46 years of age.

During the height of K-1, Mighty Mo fought the elite kickboxers in the planet and established himself among the best in combat sports. After he debuted in Japan, the American-Samoan heavyweight went on to win multiple K-1 Grand Prix tournaments, and also did well during the few times he crossed over to mixed martial arts.

After gaining success and fan fare early in his career, Mo eventually hit a rough patch both in his personal and professional life. He had understandable losses to legends and champion fighters such as Semmy Schilt, Josh Barnett and Kyotaro, but then he continued to struggle for years in the kickboxing circuit.

“Those were times that I was under the water, and I didn’t realize it,” Mighty Mo told Bloody Elbow.

For years, the hard-hitting heavyweight struggled with deep personal issues relating to family members. It took time away from training, led him to vices and away from a healthy lifestyle. The emotional stress took such a huge toll, that fighting just wasn’t the main focus anymore.

“I was dealing with too many family issues. When you get up there, people tend to take advantage of you a lot. I was dealing with all those emotional issues, and I didn’t know how to deal with it,” he explained. “You make it to the top, and so-called ‘family’ takes advantage of you.

“I had to go through a lot of issues in my life. I never really had a mentor to help and point me to do this, stay away from the family stuff, focus on your career. I didn’t have that type of person.”

These problems kept him from having the proper condition and mindset to compete at a high level, but for a stretch, he still stepped in the ring to disastrous results.

“I was just taking my youth for granted,” Mo said about how he fought on without the same focus and training, knowing he had power and athleticism to fall back on. “Being young, you never think things would go away, but things do go away. If you don’t take care of it, your blessings will diminish.”

While he struggled in kickboxing, Mo somehow still managed to do okay in his stint with Bellator through all of this. He went 3-1 in the promotion, with his only loss being against Alexander Volkov, a former M-1 champ who is currently undefeated in the UFC.

He was still winning MMA bouts, but he knew something just wasn’t right with him. Eventually, the heavyweight decided that enough is enough, and he had to focus on getting healthy and getting both his body and mind in the right place.

“There was a point where I’m looking at my kids, and why I started fighting for them,” Mo said about the turning point in his life. “To be a provider, and that this is what I love doing. I just realized that my health isn’t where it was supposed to be, because I felt it.”

After looking to clear his mind from all the emotional stress, Mo also took care of his body and went back to a healthy lifestyle. He also enlisted the services of a doctor to handle his nutrition and run tests.

“I had to get me a doctor to help me realize that my chemical balances aren’t on point,” he explained. “A nutritionist, and health doctor, to make sure all your vitamins, blood and chemistry is where it’s supposed to be. Not way down here, or way up here — either way you’re going to kill yourself. It’s got to be balanced, and those things weren’t at all… at all.

“He helped me put everything in the right place for it, where it is supposed to be to compete at this level.”

The results of this lifestyle change have been evident. During the last two years, Mo found an unlikely career resurgence through his 40’s as he was victorious in 5 straight MMA bouts. Not only did he win an open weight tournament with Korea-based promotion Road FC, he also won and defended the promotion’s title in the process.


Road FC

“It’s being way more focused. I matured as I was going along,” he said. “When I was in K-1, I was still young — I was young to the game. I never understood how everything was balanced out, and where (my health, and chemistry) was needed to be. I also didn’t know how to deal with emotional issues, and things of that sort.

“So when I was in K-1, everything was just relying more on natural and raw talent. Now, I’m more seasoned, more experienced. Yes, I’m a little older, but more experienced.”

While many just attributed the previous struggles to age catching up to him, Mo says that clearly wasn’t the case. Now that he’s put his problems behind him, his confidence has skyrocketed and he believes this is his time to finally reach his potential and perform like he always should have.

“I focus on my health to the T,” he said. “I hit harder now, even more than when I was younger. Technique, timing, talent, speed, power, everything (is now coming together).

“Now, I feel like I’m almost at a hundred percent. Even though I’m the champion now, I don’t feel like I’m totally at a 100% yet. I know I’m getting better. As you can see in my fights, I’m finishing off these guys quick, and my power and speed is off the roof.”

Many of his colleagues and former rivals are either long retired, or fighting as shells of themselves. Mo knows that fighting is a young man’s sport, so winning a tournament and a championship this late in his career is a testament to his longevity.

While he admits to having to deal with more aches and pains in training camp these days, he says he feels much better now that he can focus and train smarter.

“To tell you the truth, I don’t even think about my age, or my opponent’s. It doesn’t calculate in my head. ‘This guy is younger’ – it doesn’t even matter. To me, I think I’m a young guy. I don’t know why, but I move and I feel like a young guy.

“But for me to say it, I’ve got to be able to prove it, and I’ve proven to the world what I can do. To me when people are ‘you’re old, you’re old’ – So? What’s the problem? I’m winning.”

“This just shows who the real champions are, who the real warriors are,” he says about other fighters from his era. “I’m not taking anything away from them, but I feel like I was meant for this. (My longevity) just makes me feel like I was blessed with the skills and power and speed.”

Mo defends his belt for the second time at Road FC 40 on Saturday night. He says he only has two fights remaining on his contract, but retirement isn’t on the table just yet. If things go as planned, he’ll try and achieve the bigger things that eluded him on his younger years.

“I’m going to keep going until I’m satisfied, and I don’t even feel satisfied,” he exclaimed. “You know how it is when you feel you didn’t accomplish some of the things you know could’ve accomplished when you were on top? Because of the issues that I went through in my life, especially with my family — that held me back.

“It’s like climbing a hill. You don’t want to leave your family, so you’re throwing them on your back. You’re climbing, but if someone falls, you’ve got to climb back down and pick them back up. Then you’ll climb again. That’s the story of my life,” he shared. “I kept going back down, instead of going all the way up there and throwing a rope down and pulling them up. That’s what I should’ve done, but my life, and my career, this is what I was doing.

“I was trying to climb and pull my family, the ones that didn’t want to – I would have to go back down and pick them up. That’s what it was like.

“I feel like I got cheated in my career because I focused too much on them, when they did not care. They just took, took, took, and didn’t care. I was all worried, and I was all hurt, and my feelings — but I was thinking that I’ve got to save them.”


Road FC
Mo says winning the trilogy against fellow K-1 GP winner Hong Man Choi was yet another statement that he’s “back on point.”

While there naturally are ‘what ifs’ and thoughts on how different his career would’ve been without them, Mo knows those challenging years shaped him to be the man he is today. It led to him being a champion at Road FC, and he plans to continue proving himself both inside and outside of the cage.

“Big time, I wish I would’ve done all this before,” he said. “But it also showed me that I am strong enough to come back from that type of issue, and be here today. That’s one of the things I’ve learned. That’s the true meaning of my name. Mighty Mo is who I am, and I’m living up to that name.

“My goal is just to be at the highest level at the game, to seek and destroy every heavyweight that’s out there at this moment, at any organization. I feel I’m the baddest right now. This is the one reason why I never retired, because I felt I never gave it my 100%.

“As you can see, in Road FC, I’m destroying everybody,” he said. “I know that I can tell you whatever I want to, but my actions speak louder than my words. I want to show you that I’m the best heavyweight in the world.”

Conor McGregor reacts to the insane Gaethje vs Johnson brawl of the year candidate

Conor McGregor approves of that UFC main event brawl.

Justin Gaethje and Michael Johnson put on quite a show on their main event billing on Friday night. The pair of lightweights went back and forth, hurting each other multiple times (video here), and reportedly landing a combined 195 strikes in less than 2 rounds of action.

The undefeated former WSOF champion in Gaethje came up victorious in what would surely be one of the most memorable UFC debuts in a long time, and it also won him both Performance of the Night and Fight of the Night bonuses. The brawl was so fun, it even got the reigning lightweight champion to tweet something apart from his boxing training camp.

That was a good contest. Two fighters, fighting.

— Conor McGregor (@TheNotoriousMMA) July 8, 2017

Gaethje saw the compliment, and was asked who he wanted next. McGregor obviously has other things going on right now, and Gaethje veered away from his “anyone” answer during the event to say he wants the next big thing.

“I want Ferguson. That’s who I want. I want to take out the best in America, then I want to take out the best in the world.”

Hey @justin_gaethje, who do you want next?

His reaction? @tonyfergusonXT#TUFFinale https://t.co/lNj6ZdGYOo

— FOX Sports: UFC (@UFCONFOX) July 8, 2017

Conor McGregor approves of that UFC main event brawl.

Justin Gaethje and Michael Johnson put on quite a show on their main event billing on Friday night. The pair of lightweights went back and forth, hurting each other multiple times (video here), and reportedly landing a combined 195 strikes in less than 2 rounds of action.

The undefeated former WSOF champion in Gaethje came up victorious in what would surely be one of the most memorable UFC debuts in a long time, and it also won him both Performance of the Night and Fight of the Night bonuses. The brawl was so fun, it even got the reigning lightweight champion to tweet something apart from his boxing training camp.

Gaethje saw the compliment, and was asked who he wanted next. McGregor obviously has other things going on right now, and Gaethje veered away from his “anyone” answer during the event to say he wants the next big thing.

“I want Ferguson. That’s who I want. I want to take out the best in America, then I want to take out the best in the world.”

Freddie Roach: I might push Manny Pacquiao to retire, but that judge should be investigated

While Freddie Roach isn’t happy with the judging, he still wants to talk to Manny Pacquiao about retiring.

Manny Pacquiao lost a controversial decision to Jeff Horn that had most pundits, analysts, and even fighters scratching their heads. The Filipino’s long time trainer in Freddie Roach wasn’t happy, specifically with referee Mark Nelson and the absurd 117-111 card turned in by judge Waleksa Roldan.

“That was hard, sometimes I think people need to be investigated,” Roach told the Daily Telegraph. “At least in America where you get odd scores like that with the judges, the head commissioner should ask at some point, ‘Why? Where? Show me how you came up with that score.’”

Two head-butts that were deemed accidental left Pacquiao with two nasty cuts, but Roach was more upset with the referee allowing Horn to get away with certain tactics on the inside.

“The wrestling, getting hit behind the head a lot, it didn’t look good, but the referee didn’t pay any attention to it. I don’t know how he let a professional fighter get away with things like that. If you end up in a headlock after every exchange, someone is doing something wrong,” he said.

“That is a WBO concern, I think they should do something about it, but I don’t think they ever will.”

While Roach thinks Pacquiao should’ve still won the contest, he still wasn’t happy with his overall performance and might just talk to his pupil about hanging up the gloves.

“I’m going to talk to Manny about maybe calling it a day, maybe this is it,” Roach said. “It depends what I see when I analyse the fight again.”

While Freddie Roach isn’t happy with the judging, he still wants to talk to Manny Pacquiao about retiring.

Manny Pacquiao lost a controversial decision to Jeff Horn that had most pundits, analysts, and even fighters scratching their heads. The Filipino’s long time trainer in Freddie Roach wasn’t happy, specifically with referee Mark Nelson and the absurd 117-111 card turned in by judge Waleksa Roldan.

“That was hard, sometimes I think people need to be investigated,” Roach told the Daily Telegraph. “At least in America where you get odd scores like that with the judges, the head commissioner should ask at some point, ‘Why? Where? Show me how you came up with that score.’”

Two head-butts that were deemed accidental left Pacquiao with two nasty cuts, but Roach was more upset with the referee allowing Horn to get away with certain tactics on the inside.

“The wrestling, getting hit behind the head a lot, it didn’t look good, but the referee didn’t pay any attention to it. I don’t know how he let a professional fighter get away with things like that. If you end up in a headlock after every exchange, someone is doing something wrong,” he said.

“That is a WBO concern, I think they should do something about it, but I don’t think they ever will.”

While Roach thinks Pacquiao should’ve still won the contest, he still wasn’t happy with his overall performance and might just talk to his pupil about hanging up the gloves.

“I’m going to talk to Manny about maybe calling it a day, maybe this is it,” Roach said. “It depends what I see when I analyse the fight again.”