Tye Ruotolo Wants To Fight Garry Tonon In MMA After BJJ Win: “I Think My Hands Are Better Too”

Tye RuotoloBJJ prodigy Tye Ruotolo has his eyes set on competing in the sport of mixed martial arts next. Making his submission grappling debut in ONE Championship, Tye Ruotolo managed to tap out the legendary Garry Tonon at ONE Championship 157. In just two minutes of the contest, Ruotolo displayed an exhibition of superior movement before […]

Tye Ruotolo

BJJ prodigy Tye Ruotolo has his eyes set on competing in the sport of mixed martial arts next.

Making his submission grappling debut in ONE Championship, Tye Ruotolo managed to tap out the legendary Garry Tonon at ONE Championship 157. In just two minutes of the contest, Ruotolo displayed an exhibition of superior movement before locking in a D’Arce choke to announce his presence in the promotion.

Tye Ruotolo steals the show

During a post-fight interview, Ruotolo spoke to the press about his plans for the future and touched on the idea of competing in MMA.

“My goal in jiu-jitsu right now is to just keep being the best version of myself, and to get to the title in jiu-jitsu and to the title in MMA is what my brother and I want to do as well. So we’ve got a lot of goals right now,” Ruotolo said.

“I just finished that match, so I really don’t know who I want next in jiu-jitsu. Maybe an MMA debut. My brother and I are really scratching for that. I’m really down to fight anybody in the world. Big, small, I’m ready to go.” (h/t SCMP)

Hinting at returning to competition in MMA instead of BJJ, Tye Ruotolo expanded on the possibility.

Garry Tonon would be fun for the fans for sure. He’s 6-1 in MMA. He just came off a title fight, and I don’t know if Chatri [Sityodtong, ONE CEO] would let me debut [against] Garry Tonon. I had dinner with him the other night, I think he kind of seemed interested in the idea.

“That would be really cool. After my performance tonight I kind of deserve it. In jiu-jitsu I proved I’m better than him, in the most humble way possible, and I think that my hands are better than his too, just being realistic. So I’d love to fight him in MMA.”

Along with Tye, his twin brother Kade Ruotolo also made his debut in the promotion on the same night. Kade dominated his way against the Japanese veteran Shinya Aoki to grab a decision win.

If the twins’ BJJ abilities are any indication, they may be looking at a flourishing MMA career ahead. A lot depends on how ONE CEO Sityodtong plans to carry them in the organization and will likely give them a shot in MMA if an agreement is reached.

How do you think the Ruotolo brothers would fare in MMA?

Buggy Choke – The Latest BJJ Fade Technique

Buggy chokeThe buggy choke is the latest fade technique to hit the Jiu Jitsu world. Since it was introduced, the buggy choke has been attempted in everything from Jiu Jitsu competitions and MMA. It has caught on like wildfire and now just about everyone is trying to do the buggy choke. Since everyone is going for […]

Buggy choke

The buggy choke is the latest fade technique to hit the Jiu Jitsu world. Since it was introduced, the buggy choke has been attempted in everything from Jiu Jitsu competitions and MMA.

It has caught on like wildfire and now just about everyone is trying to do the buggy choke. Since everyone is going for it, a breakdown of the buggy choke seems to be needed. 

Here is everything you need to know about the buggy choke. From who invented it, how it works, and important details you’ll need to remember for locking it in.

Who invented the buggy choke? 

There are two different people that claim to have invented the buggy the choke. The first was a Ralph Gracie white belt named Austin Hardt that showed after tapping all of his teammates with it.

Austin and his professors claim that he came up with the move in 2016. After tapping all of his teammates, Hardt uploaded a buggy choke instructional and the BJJ community loved it.

Then after the buggy choke first started getting popular, black belt named Jacob Sebastian Magee claimed he invented the buggy choke. Claiming that he started doing it 5 years before Austin’s video was uploaded to Youtube.

There’s no way to confirm Magee’s claim, but either way the buggy choke has become quite popular.

Now, there are currently three different variations of the choke and many variations will be developed in the future. The choke has now been pulled off multiple times within both MMA and BJJ competitions.

How does the buggy choke work? 

The buggy choke is basically a variation of a reverse triangle choke from bottom side-control. It has caught a lot of grapplers off guard, because having side-control is one of the most dominant positions in grappling.

In this choke, you lock up your triangle with your arm in. Your arm blocks off blood to one side of your opponent’s neck and your legs block off the other part.

It comes on quickly and before your opponent realizes it, they’ll have to tap or go to sleep.

Ruotolo bros buggy choke 

The Ruotolo bros buggy choke from on bottom in side-control starts with you getting on your side and turning into your opponent. While you’re turning, you also bring your outside arm to the other side of your head.

It may feel like you’re giving up an arm triangle, but if you stay on your side, you should avoid the choke. When you turn in, your opponent will naturally react by trying to flatten you back down with force.

This is the reaction you want for your opponent to get as close as possible to you. If they’re really strong, you can cup their shoulder and lift up to relieve some of the pressure.

You’re going to stay on your side and bring your outside leg to your arm. Taking an underhook right under your knee to make the buggy choke tight.

Make sure to do a side crunch when grabbing your leg to keep your opponent’s head in place. Now, to lock in the choke, Gable grip your hands, triangle your legs, and pull your opponent in as you squeeze.

Buggy choke variation #2 

The original buggy choke that Austin Hardt came up with has exactly the same steps as the Ruotolo brother’s version. But Austin’s original buggy choke, he doesn’t triangle his legs or locks his hands together.

You start out the same in side-control on the bottom and frame on your opponent to get on your side. Pushing on them as you bring your outside arm to the other side of your head.

Your opponent will instinctively try to smash you back down to the mat. When they do this, stay on your side and bring your outside foot to your hand.

Grab the top of your foot and pull down on it to try and get the finish. The Ruotolo brother’s version is better with triangling your legs and palm grips, but the original is effective.

Buggy choke variation #3

There is another version of the buggy choke that was developed, that’s done turning away from your opponent. Austin Hardt also developed this version to attack the buggy choke from both sides.

For this one to work, you can’t let your opponent establish control of your inside. If they control this arm, then you won’t be able to do this buggy choke variation.

A good way to start this variation is to do the first steps of the normal buggy choke. Frame on your opponent’s neck and elbow escape out to make space.

When you make this space, you can pull your inside arm away and turn to your outside hip. Generally it’s a critical error to turn away from your opponent, but you’re using it as bait.

They will instinctively follow you and try to smash you to the mat. Your inside arm is going to go over your opponent’s neck as you’re basing on your outside elbow.

Now, bring your inside foot to you hand and grab your foot as you sit up. Your opponent will base out with their hand to defend this, which allows you to triangle your legs together.

To finish, scoop your hips, connect your hands, and squeeze to get the tap.This video demonstrates the last two buggy choke variations detailed above.

How to defend against the buggy choke 

BJJ grapplers have been getting tricky with the buggy choke, so you really have to watch out for it now. Here are some techniques that you can use to defend against the buggy choke.

Drive your head up

When your opponent brings their arm over your head, that is a clear sign that they’re going for the choke. If you keep your head down, this will allow them to continue their buggy choke set up.

But as you see them bring their arm over, you need to drive you head up towards their head. Driving your head up will create more space and prevent your opponent from continuing their set up.

Block opponent’s hip

If your opponent is already locking in their buggy choke, you have to react quickly to prevent being submitted. What you can do to try and defend it is block their hip using your elbow.

As you block their hip, you’re going to drive your head forward. Doing this will help open space between your neck and shoulder, which will take off the pressure.

Bend opponent’s neck

This is your last line of defense when your opponent has their buggy choke locked in. You’re going to do the same defense as the second option with extra detail added.

Take your far elbow over your opponent’s head and push it back into their neck. This bends their head away from their body, which makes their body unaligned with their head.

It is extremely hard to finish chokes when your head and body aren’t aligned. This video demonstrates the details of all three of these defenses.

Tips to remember for doing the buggy choke

The buggy choke is a great move to add to your arsonal, but you will need to get the details down. Here are important tips that you will need to remember when going for a buggy choke.

  • Get on your side: For any variation of the buggy choke to work, you must get on your side. If you stay flat on your back, your opponent will get pressure on you and prevent the choke.
  • Clear the head: When you do an elbow escape to make space, your arm needs to clear your opponent’s head. Your tricep needs to press down on the side of their neck as you stay on your side.
  • Side crunch: Before you try to bring your leg over, do a side crunch to push your opponent’s head down. This will make it easier to underhook your leg and help make the choke tight.
  • Arm under knee: To make the buggy choke tighter and harder to escape, make sure to underhook at the crook of your knee. Picture doing an uppercut to shoot your arm under your knee.
  • The Locks: To finish the original buggy choke, you just grab your foot, but the locks make it tighter and harder to escape. After under-hooking your leg, triangle your legs, and Gable grip your hands together to make your choke even tighter.(Also harder to escape)
  • The finish: You finish a buggy choke just like you would a traditional reverse triangle choke. Try to turn onto your outside hip as you squeeze in to get the most pressure possible.
  • Base on elbow: Also, when doing the buggy choke variation on your outside hip to base on your elbow. If you do not base on that elbow, your opponent will flatten you out or even go for a back take.

Buggy Choke – The Latest BJJ Fade Technique

Buggy chokeThe buggy choke is the latest fade technique to hit the Jiu Jitsu world. Since it was introduced, the buggy choke has been attempted in everything from Jiu Jitsu competitions and MMA. It has caught on like wildfire and now just about everyone is trying to do the buggy choke. Since everyone is going for […]

Buggy choke

The buggy choke is the latest fade technique to hit the Jiu Jitsu world. Since it was introduced, the buggy choke has been attempted in everything from Jiu Jitsu competitions and MMA.

It has caught on like wildfire and now just about everyone is trying to do the buggy choke. Since everyone is going for it, a breakdown of the buggy choke seems to be needed. 

Here is everything you need to know about the buggy choke. From who invented it, how it works, and important details you’ll need to remember for locking it in.

Who invented the buggy choke? 

There are two different people that claim to have invented the buggy the choke. The first was a Ralph Gracie white belt named Austin Hardt that showed after tapping all of his teammates with it.

Austin and his professors claim that he came up with the move in 2016. After tapping all of his teammates, Hardt uploaded a buggy choke instructional and the BJJ community loved it.

Then after the buggy choke first started getting popular, black belt named Jacob Sebastian Magee claimed he invented the buggy choke. Claiming that he started doing it 5 years before Austin’s video was uploaded to Youtube.

There’s no way to confirm Magee’s claim, but either way the buggy choke has become quite popular.

Now, there are currently three different variations of the choke and many variations will be developed in the future. The choke has now been pulled off multiple times within both MMA and BJJ competitions.

How does the buggy choke work? 

The buggy choke is basically a variation of a reverse triangle choke from bottom side-control. It has caught a lot of grapplers off guard, because having side-control is one of the most dominant positions in grappling.

In this choke, you lock up your triangle with your arm in. Your arm blocks off blood to one side of your opponent’s neck and your legs block off the other part.

It comes on quickly and before your opponent realizes it, they’ll have to tap or go to sleep.

Ruotolo bros buggy choke 

The Ruotolo bros buggy choke from on bottom in side-control starts with you getting on your side and turning into your opponent. While you’re turning, you also bring your outside arm to the other side of your head.

It may feel like you’re giving up an arm triangle, but if you stay on your side, you should avoid the choke. When you turn in, your opponent will naturally react by trying to flatten you back down with force.

This is the reaction you want for your opponent to get as close as possible to you. If they’re really strong, you can cup their shoulder and lift up to relieve some of the pressure.

You’re going to stay on your side and bring your outside leg to your arm. Taking an underhook right under your knee to make the buggy choke tight.

Make sure to do a side crunch when grabbing your leg to keep your opponent’s head in place. Now, to lock in the choke, Gable grip your hands, triangle your legs, and pull your opponent in as you squeeze.

Buggy choke variation #2 

The original buggy choke that Austin Hardt came up with has exactly the same steps as the Ruotolo brother’s version. But Austin’s original buggy choke, he doesn’t triangle his legs or locks his hands together.

You start out the same in side-control on the bottom and frame on your opponent to get on your side. Pushing on them as you bring your outside arm to the other side of your head.

Your opponent will instinctively try to smash you back down to the mat. When they do this, stay on your side and bring your outside foot to your hand.

Grab the top of your foot and pull down on it to try and get the finish. The Ruotolo brother’s version is better with triangling your legs and palm grips, but the original is effective.

Buggy choke variation #3

There is another version of the buggy choke that was developed, that’s done turning away from your opponent. Austin Hardt also developed this version to attack the buggy choke from both sides.

For this one to work, you can’t let your opponent establish control of your inside. If they control this arm, then you won’t be able to do this buggy choke variation.

A good way to start this variation is to do the first steps of the normal buggy choke. Frame on your opponent’s neck and elbow escape out to make space.

When you make this space, you can pull your inside arm away and turn to your outside hip. Generally it’s a critical error to turn away from your opponent, but you’re using it as bait.

They will instinctively follow you and try to smash you to the mat. Your inside arm is going to go over your opponent’s neck as you’re basing on your outside elbow.

Now, bring your inside foot to you hand and grab your foot as you sit up. Your opponent will base out with their hand to defend this, which allows you to triangle your legs together.

To finish, scoop your hips, connect your hands, and squeeze to get the tap.This video demonstrates the last two buggy choke variations detailed above.

How to defend against the buggy choke 

BJJ grapplers have been getting tricky with the buggy choke, so you really have to watch out for it now. Here are some techniques that you can use to defend against the buggy choke.

Drive your head up

When your opponent brings their arm over your head, that is a clear sign that they’re going for the choke. If you keep your head down, this will allow them to continue their buggy choke set up.

But as you see them bring their arm over, you need to drive you head up towards their head. Driving your head up will create more space and prevent your opponent from continuing their set up.

Block opponent’s hip

If your opponent is already locking in their buggy choke, you have to react quickly to prevent being submitted. What you can do to try and defend it is block their hip using your elbow.

As you block their hip, you’re going to drive your head forward. Doing this will help open space between your neck and shoulder, which will take off the pressure.

Bend opponent’s neck

This is your last line of defense when your opponent has their buggy choke locked in. You’re going to do the same defense as the second option with extra detail added.

Take your far elbow over your opponent’s head and push it back into their neck. This bends their head away from their body, which makes their body unaligned with their head.

It is extremely hard to finish chokes when your head and body aren’t aligned. This video demonstrates the details of all three of these defenses.

Tips to remember for doing the buggy choke

The buggy choke is a great move to add to your arsonal, but you will need to get the details down. Here are important tips that you will need to remember when going for a buggy choke.

  • Get on your side: For any variation of the buggy choke to work, you must get on your side. If you stay flat on your back, your opponent will get pressure on you and prevent the choke.
  • Clear the head: When you do an elbow escape to make space, your arm needs to clear your opponent’s head. Your tricep needs to press down on the side of their neck as you stay on your side.
  • Side crunch: Before you try to bring your leg over, do a side crunch to push your opponent’s head down. This will make it easier to underhook your leg and help make the choke tight.
  • Arm under knee: To make the buggy choke tighter and harder to escape, make sure to underhook at the crook of your knee. Picture doing an uppercut to shoot your arm under your knee.
  • The Locks: To finish the original buggy choke, you just grab your foot, but the locks make it tighter and harder to escape. After under-hooking your leg, triangle your legs, and Gable grip your hands together to make your choke even tighter.(Also harder to escape)
  • The finish: You finish a buggy choke just like you would a traditional reverse triangle choke. Try to turn onto your outside hip as you squeeze in to get the most pressure possible.
  • Base on elbow: Also, when doing the buggy choke variation on your outside hip to base on your elbow. If you do not base on that elbow, your opponent will flatten you out or even go for a back take.

Closed Guard vs Open Guard

In Jiu Jitsu, practitioners use two different kinds of guard in the martial art. Either closed guard or a variation of open guard. There are different camps in the debate of these BJJ guards that one style is superior to the other.  Here is a short breakdown of the closed guard vs open guard debate. […]

In Jiu Jitsu, practitioners use two different kinds of guard in the martial art. Either closed guard or a variation of open guard.

There are different camps in the debate of these BJJ guards that one style is superior to the other. 

Here is a short breakdown of the closed guard vs open guard debate. Going over the history of both guards and the positives and negatives of each style of guard.

The history of closed guard vs open guard

Before we lay out the positives and negatives of closed guard vs open guard, we have to detail their histories. The stories of these BJJ techniques intertwine and symbolize evolution of Jiu Jitsu and grappling

The open guard

Many grapplers may think that the closed guard came before the open guard, but that would be incorrect. The open guard is one of the oldest grappling techniques in existence.

When a fight would go to the ground, early grapplers would use primitive versions of open guard. Using unrefined sweeping techniques to reverse their opponents and get on top.

The person responsible for refining the guard and open guard was Helio Gracie. When he and his older brother began developing Jiu Jitsu, it was Helio that began developing the open guard.

His reasoning behind developing early open guard techniques was to help weaker grapplers beat bigger and stronger opponents. Using leverage and timing to beat bigger opponents.

These open guard techniques help lay the foundation for BJJ and the importance for knowing how to fight on your back. Through open guard, different types of guards would be developed in the years to come.

The history of closed guard

The closed guard would actually not be developed until decades after BJJ was first being developed. This style of guard began being developed during the late 1970s and early 1980s.

BJJ historians pinpointed that the closed guard first started to be developed in Master Osvaldo Alves’ school. Alves was actually a Judo practitioner, but didn’t want to pay licensing fees to call his gym a Judo school.

He chose to say he taught “Jiu-Jitsu” at his school that was in a rec center. Which was actually just a front for an illegal casino run by an organized crime group.

Alves was also friends with members of the Gracie family, which made cross training at his academy. Two Carlson Gracie students named Otávio Peixotino and Marcio do Santos would routinely go train at Alves’ school.

Osvaldo’s students Sergio Penha and Pascoal Duarte would share guard concepts with Carlson’s students. These brainstorming  sessions would lead to what we now refer to as the closed guard.

The four grapplers would begin testing closed guard at different competitions. Peixotino would submit Sylvio Behring with a closed guard armbar in competition. Pascoal Duarte would submit Royce Gracie using the closed guard and Sergio Penha would become an all time great BJJ athlete.

They showed that the closed guard was incredibly effective and was widely adopted by almost every BJJ school.

The positives of open guard

Open guard has many positive qualities, which is why it is the most used style of guards in BJJ. Here are the most positive aspects of open guard.

Maneuverability

In an open guard, you are far more maneuverable than you are in a closed guard. Your hips are more free to move around and create space to do sweeps and submissions. 

Endless possibilities

In an open guard, there are endless possibilities for evolution. As we’ve witnessed, there are constant innovations made to the open guard. 

There are now numerous types of open guards used in Jiu Jitsu along with even more sweeps and submissions.

Types of open guards include:

The positives of closed guard

Close guard has some really good positive aspects, as well. Here are some of the biggest positives of the closed guard.

Best Guard For Self Defense 

The closed guard is one of the best guards that you can use for self defense purposes. In a closed guard, you make the distance shorter between you and your opponent.

Making it easier for you to hold onto their arms and keep them from hitting you. Also stopping them from creating distance to try and land a knockout shot.

Easier & Tighter Submissions

Not only is closed guard better for self defense, but submissions from the guard are easier to get and tighter. In closed guard, there is less space to cover to get submissions and they’re tighter than closed guard submissions. Also making them harder to escape than if they were done in an open guard.

The negatives of open guard

Even though open guard allows for better maneuverability and has endless possibilities, they do have flaws. Here are some of the biggest flaws with playing an open guard.

More space

To pass any type of guard, you need to create space in order to pass it. When you play open guard, there is a large amount of space already given to your opponent. 

They have less steps in order to escape your guard and can also easily strike you.

The negatives of closed guard

Hard to play if you’re small or against a bigger person

If you’re a smaller grappler going against someone that is quite larger than you, closed guard isn’t the best option. Especially if you can’t lock your ankles together to close your guard.

You will not be able to move well and highly unlikely to submit your larger opponent. The larger opponent will also more than likely drop heavy pressure on top of you, which can be unbearable.

Stalling position

Sometimes a person that is playing closed guard realizes that they can’t submit or sweep their opponent. When this happens, they will usually just resort to holding their opponent in their guard.

Doing this turns the closed guard into a stalling position, where no advancements happen and is boring to watch.

Belt Whipping In BJJ – The Belt Gauntlet

Belt Whipping in BJJYou may have seen belt whipping ceremonies on videos or unfortunately been on the receiving end of one. Belt whipping in BJJ, also known as ‘The Belt Gauntlet’ is an old tradition that is used by many old school Jiu Jitsu academies. Not many know where the tradition comes from, but let’s see if we […]

Belt Whipping in BJJ

You may have seen belt whipping ceremonies on videos or unfortunately been on the receiving end of one. Belt whipping in BJJ, also known as ‘The Belt Gauntlet’ is an old tradition that is used by many old school Jiu Jitsu academies.

Not many know where the tradition comes from, but let’s see if we can learn more about belt whipping in BJJ. Going over how it started, when they are done and different opinions about the practice.

We’ll also detail other types of ceremonies that are practiced within BJJ.

What is belt whipping in BJJ called?

In English, the ceremony of belt whipping in BJJ is known as “the gauntlet.” The name they use for the gauntlet in Brazil is the “Corredor Polonês” that means Polish corridor or just corredor.

When is the belt whipping in BJJ done?

The belt whipping in BJJ or belt gauntlet as some called it is done only on two special occasions. Either whenever teammates get belt promotions or it’s a teammate’s birthday.

Who came up with belt whipping in BJJ? 

Many assume that the ceremonial belt whipping in BJJ was first practiced in Brazil, but it actually wasn’t. Many old school BJJ black belts credit black belt Chris Haueter with coming up with the practice. One of the first 12 non Brazilian black belts in the world, who was an early student of the Machado brothers.

Haueter tells the story that he started doing this practice in the early 1990s at the Machado brothers’ school. Chris was running classes while the brothers were away filming a movie, when he got this idea.

He just got back from military training and felt that the gym needed a sort of hazing ritual to build comradery. Haueter admits that the idea was a bit dumb and did get out of hand after a while.

Nonetheless, the practice spread to other gyms and belt whipping in BJJ became a thing.

The rules for belt whipping in BJJ

From videos you’ve probably seen, the gauntlet looks chaotic free for all. But there are actually rules set in place, so nobody gets seriously hurt.

  • Teammates make two lines with a path in between for the person walking the gauntlet.
  • The person walking the gauntlet has to walk down and back one just one person.
  • You are only allowed to hit them in the body and back.
  • No head shots, face shots, or groin shots.
  • The person walking the gauntlet has to cover their head with their jacket for protection.
  • Participants are only allowed to use their BJJ belt.

Critics against belt whipping in BJJ? 

There are many critics of belt whipping in BJJ that see the act as violent, unnecessary, and kind of dumb. One of the biggest critics of this act is world champion Caio Terra who spoke out against belt whipping.

Stating that there was no reason to be doing this violent act in BJJ

Other types of BJJ ceremonies

The gauntlet isn’t the only type of BJJ ceremony that schools practice within the martial art. There are quite a few different types of ceremonies that different gyms practice.

Shark Tank

When someone is about to be promoted, there are some Jiu Jitsu gyms that put them into the shark tank. The type of training, where you’re put in the middle of the mat and have to roll everyone without a break. Once you complete the shark tank, you are awarded your belt.

Throws and Takedowns

Once you get promoted, some gyms will put you through the ringer, where everyone gets to do a takedown on you. Your teammates will all get in line and get to do one takedown or Judo throw on you without you resisting.

Promoted at the podium

Then of course, nearly every Jiu Jitsu school does the ceremonial promotion at the podium. Whenever a student competes at a big event, their instructor will surprise them with a belt promotion on the podium. Many of the best BJJ athletes in the world have been promoted to black belt on the podium. 

Should belt whipping in BJJ be done away with?

Some grapplers believe that belt whipping has no place in BJJ and should be done away with. Many like Caio Terra don’t see the need for practicing this act within the martial art.

Is belt whipping in BJJ dumb, violent, and probably unnecessary? Probably, but the Jiu Jitsu schools that do belt whipping do it out of love and comradery between the students.

There is no malice behind the act and they aren’t trying to seriously hurt their teammate. Belt whipping of course isn’t a thing that is done at all BJJ gyms and only done at certain schools.

Not everyone is a fan of the practice, but it isn’t going anywhere and BJJ gyms will continue the practice.

Guard Passes In BJJ

Guard passes BJJPlaying guard is one of the most popular games played within Jiu Jitsu. Not only is it one of the most popular, but also one of the most complex games to beat. In BJJ, there are now numerous types of guards that you need to learn to defend against and pass. That is why we’ve […]

Guard passes BJJ

Playing guard is one of the most popular games played within Jiu Jitsu. Not only is it one of the most popular, but also one of the most complex games to beat.

In BJJ, there are now numerous types of guards that you need to learn to defend against and pass. That is why we’ve put together this list of guard passes.

Below is a list of techniques to pass just about every type of guard within Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. 

Closed Guard Pass 

A closed guard pass is one of the very first passes that you learn in BJJ and that includes opening the guard. The knee post method is one of the most effective ways to pass the closed guard.

Your first step for this pass is close your knees and press them against your opponent’s hips. This keeps them from easily breaking your posture to set up a sweep or submission.

Next, take double lapel grips and push them into your opponent’s armpits. Once you take these grips, your opponent will have to break the grips before trying to break your posture.

For the next step, you’re going to keep your grips and come up to your feet. Then you’re going to put your knee between your opponent’s legs and begin to open their guard.

You then step back with your other knee and bend your knee to open your opponent’s guard. From there, you can do any type of open guard pass you wish.

Half Guard Pass

One of the best ways to pass half guard is with a knee cut pass. There’s various ways to do this pass and their all effective.

For this variation, start by grabbing a sleeve grip on your opponent. This grip will help prevent your opponent from turning on their side and posturing up..

Next, step to the side and drive your knee in half guard to the mat. Then grab above your opponent’s elbow and slide into side-control.

Lockdown Pass

The lockdown half guard can be annoying to deal with and it stalls the action of a roll. But it is beatable when you use a pass like this one.

Your naturally reaction will be to move up, but you need to start the pass by moving your body down. Then from here, all you do is bend your knee our and switch your base.

Now, you’re in a reverse half guard and have broken the lockdown. Pass reverse half guard by pulling your opponent’s top knee up, while kicking their bottom knee away, and back stepping.

Butterfly Guard Pass 

Butterfly is a super effective guard to use, but it’s pretty easy to pass. One butterfly guard pass you can do is the wheel turn.

While in butterfly guard, cross grab your opponent’s knee and behind their back to their far shoulder. Once you establish these two grips, all you do is turn your opponent like a wheel and pass to side-control.

Collar-Sleeve Guard Pass

Collar and sleeve guard is a basic guard that you’ll often run into while training. Here is a method to defend against it.

When someone used a collar and sleeve guard, they’ll often put their foot on your bicep. The first step is to break the sleeve grip by turning your hand out and taking your own grip.

Your other hand is going to come inside your opponent’s leg and take a pant grip. Now your open just has an open guard that you can pass with any type of pass you like.

Deep Half Guard Pass

Deep half guard is widely popular and hard to pass. This deep half pass is simple and effective.

Your first steps are to get the knee that’s in half guard to the mat and control your opponent’s arm. Using two grips at your opponent’s sleeve and above their elbow.

Now, with the opponent’s arm controlled, take your free leg, and swing it over your opponent’s head. Once you pass your leg free, you’ll begin to pass half guard and go into side-control.

Take a collar grip and drive your opponent’s head away from their body as you side into side-control.

De La Riva Guard Pass 

The De La Riva guard is widely used ib BJJ at all levels. It is a guard that you must know how to pass in order to advance your Jiu Jitsu game.

The first detail for passing the DLR is to keep your posture and break your opponent’s sleeve grip.  Once you break the collar grip, you’re going to grab a collar grip and a grip on your opponent’s pants.

Next, you’re going to do a small backstep to take their foot off your hip and then step back. When you come back, you need to squat down on your opponent’s leg to secure your posture.

Once you’ve secured your posture, push your opponent’s knee as you loop your hand collar gripping over the knee. Now, drive your knee in between your opponent’s legs, drive it to the mat, slide out, and go to side-control.

Reverse De La Riva Pass 

You’ll not only have to deal with De La Riva guard, but also reverse De La Riva guard. A knee cut is a great way to pass reverse DLR guard.

Start by driving your knee in and take your grips. One grip on your opponent’s collar and a cross grab on their knee.

Pull the collar grip up as you push the knee grip down to lock your opponent in place. Now, you’re going to drive your knee in and then quickly out over your opponent’s shin.

Keep your grips and connect your knee to their hip to complete the pass and take side-control.

Spider Guard Pass 

The spider guard is a very popular guard among guard players in Jiu Jitsu that is quite effective. Luckily, there are various ways to pass spider guard, which includes this easy pass.

In spider guard, start by pushing one of your opponent’s knees forward and pulling the other back. Next, circle your hand under the knee you pushed and counter grab their with inside knee grip.

Now, you’re going to take a big step to the side and do a leg drag and walk towards your opponent’s hips. Keep pressure on your opponent’s hips and take a collar grip.

Then, drop your head down, hold the opponent’s head, put down shoulder pressure, and pass.

Rubber Guard Pass

If you train in No-Gi Jiu Jitsu, then chances are that you will run into rubber guard. Here’s how you can pass the basic mission control position in rubber guard.

Put your hands on the mat and hop to your feet as you bring your head over your partner’s head. Once you’re up, youre going to turn your elbows down towards the floor.

Now, you’re going to limp arm out and stand straight up to get out of the rubber guard. Ending up in an open guard position and ready to pass.

Lasso Guard Pass 

Lasso guard is highly technical and can be difficult to try and pass. This lasso guard pass is a good one for when the opponent has a tight lass with their foot on your back.

Start by pushing your opponent’s knee down and drop into the knee slice position. Don’t try to pass just yet or you’ll be put into a bicep slicer or swept.

Instead, take a collar grip, drop your shoulder to your opponent’s chest, and step to the side. Now, hug the head, put down heavy shoulder pressure, and slide out your knee to complete the pass.

Lasso/Spider Guard Pass 

Some guard players will even mix the lasso guard and spider guard into a variation of both guards. But a stomp and slide pass is a great option to get out of this guard.

Start by taking a collar grip with your arm that is stuck in the lasso. Then grab a pant grip on the spider guard side and turn the opponent’s knee towards you.

Now with their leg in place, you’re going to stomp on their leg to break the spider guard grip. After you stomp, take a c grip on your partner’s leg doing the lasso, and step around their leg.

Your opponent will react by throwing their leg back over, so you let them. As they take it back, you’re going to knee cut pass right into side-control.

Lapel/Worm Guard Pass

Lapel guard or worm guard is one of the most annoying guard to get stuck in. More people are playing this guard now more than ever and you must know how to deal with it.

When you’re standing above you’re opponent and they go to pass your lapel, this is when you must react. Take a wide stance that will force your opponent to sit up.

This is the reaction you want to take a grip on the back of their Gi. Next, you’re going to take two steps to pass your opponent’s guard.

Step out with your inside leg and place your knee on their elbow, and then do a backstep with your other leg. Now, use your grips to pull your opponent down and take side-control.

X Guard Pass

X guard is another widely popular guard that allows for multiple sweeps and entries to the back mount. That is why you need to know how to defend against this guard.

Take a pant grip on the leg that’s the top hook and put your weight on your back leg. Then in one motion, you’re going to step your lead up and loop it over your opponent’s leg.

Bringing your leg between your opponent’s legs and then stepping to the side to take side-control.

Single Leg X Guard Pass

Along with x guard, you will have to know how to defend against the single x guard. The variation of x guard that many grapplers commonly transfer to for sweeps and leg locks.

Start by driving your knee down on your opponent’s body to create pressure and take away space. Next, you’ll have to address the foo that is on your hip.

Grab the top of your opponent’s foot as your bring your hip forward to clear the foot away. Right you take the foot away, you need to drop your hip and close the space, so they can’t put it back.

Next base on the mat and bring your knee in and slide back to land in half guard. Now, turn your toes down as you back step out of half guard and into side-control.

Shin To Shin Guard Pass

Shin to shin guard is a guard that is used for sweeps and often as a transition to x guard variations. Your first step is to not let your opponent connect their shin to your shin.

Pass shin to shin guard by stepping between your opponent’s legs, getting an underhook, and knee cutting out.

Z Guard Pass

More grapplers are playing half guard more than ever and one particularly popular version is the z guard or knee shield.  Here is a great knee shield pass option in the Gi.

Start by taking a collar grip on your opponent and rolling your elbow in to pull them forward. Then, take your other hand and slide it between your opponent’s legs palm down.

Next drop your head down and start to put heavy on your opponent to keep them in place. Now, you’re inside knee is going to cut across your opponent’s shin as you keep the pressure with your head.

Pull your collar grip in and keep downward pressure on your opponent as you walk your hips out to side-control.