10 Times MMA Stars Went Crazy Overseas

Some major MMA stars went crazy overseas in the early days of the sport.

The post 10 Times MMA Stars Went Crazy Overseas appeared first on LowKickMMA.com.

MMA is a global sport, and as such stars often find themselves traveling overseas to all kinds of exotic and outlandish locations to train or fight.

As you’ll see in this article, that can often lead to some of the craziest, scariest and most bizarre experiences of their lives.

Eddie Alvarez Knocks Out Mafia Man In Russia

Back in 2007, ‘The Underground King,’ Eddie Alvarez was the welterweight champion for Bodog Fighting Championships and traveled to St. Petersburg, Russia, to defend his title against Nick Thompson.

Following the event, he attended an after-party on a yacht hosted by one of Bodog’s owners from Russia, where, according to fellow fighter Chael Sonnen who was also in attendance that night, a Russian gangster at the party punched one of the Bodog ring girls.

Outraged by what he’d just witnessed and not realizing who he was dealing with, Alvarez then stepped forward and knocked him out cold with one punch.

Sonnen says that portion of the story is 100% true, but admits that he doesn’t have concrete proof of what happened next, though the rumor was that Alvarez was then escorted from the yacht by Russian mobsters and taken out to the middle of nowhere, where a hole was dug and his life was threatened before they finally set him free.

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10 MMA Stars Who Fought The UFC In Court

Fighting an opponent in the octagon is one thing, but over the years, some mixed martial arts stars have gone one step further and taken it upon themselves to battle the UFC themselves. In this article, we’ll explore 10 such instances where big-name fighters have sought to slug it out with the sport’s leading organization […]

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Fighting an opponent in the octagon is one thing, but over the years, some mixed martial arts stars have gone one step further and taken it upon themselves to battle the UFC themselves.

In this article, we’ll explore 10 such instances where big-name fighters have sought to slug it out with the sport’s leading organization in a court of law, and often found that it can be just as grueling and painful a process as going toe-to-toe with a bitter rival in the octagon.

Mark Hunt

The fan favorite knockout artist was incensed after losing to returning superstar Brock Lesnar at UFC 200 in 2016 only to then discover that his opponent had subsequently tested positive for banned PED clomiphene, leading to him being suspended for a year and the fight being amended to a no contest.

Hunt had claimed pre-fight that Lesnar was using performance-enhancing drugs and afterward became convinced that the UFC had purposefully turned a blind eye to his opponent’s PED use in the lead-up to the fight, noting that he’d been allowed to circumnavigate a required four-month USADA testing period for all returning fighters.

As such, Hunt filed a lawsuit against UFC, Dana White and Lesnar in 2017 seeking millions of dollars in damages, accusing them of Conspiracy to Commit Racketeering, Fraud, False Pretenses, Breach of Contract, Breach of Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Duty, Negligence and Unjust Enrichment.

A few months later the UFC would join White and Lesnar’s lawyers in filing motion’s to dismiss, claiming Hunt’s suit had “an utter dearth of specific allegations,” and a failure to establish a link, “between the injury asserted and the purported injurious conduct.”

However, that motion was denied and Hunt and his legal team are now pursuing an amended lawsuit that alleges the UFC intentionally delayed announcing Lesnar’s fight with Hunt until a month before UFC 200, because he was, “using banned substances and needed additional time in order to circumvent testing procedures.”

The case has yet to be resolved, but in the meantime, Hunt has continued to fight in the UFC, while recently warning his future opponents, “if you get popped for steroids I’m suing your punk-asses!”

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Pat Miletich: McGregor Needs to ‘Cheat Within The Rules’ on Aug. 26

Pat Miletich believes Conor McGregor will have to bend the rules as much as possible to defeat Floyd Mayweather. During a recent appearance on MMAFighting.com‘s “The MMA Hour,” the AXS TV mixed martial arts commentator and former trainer talked about McGregor’s chances for his Aug. 26 boxing match: “[If] I’m training a fighter who’s going […]

Pat Miletich believes Conor McGregor will have to bend the rules as much as possible to defeat Floyd Mayweather. During a recent appearance on MMAFighting.com‘s “The MMA Hour,” the AXS TV mixed martial arts commentator and former trainer talked about McGregor’s chances for his Aug. 26 boxing match: “[If] I’m training a fighter who’s going […]

Repentance Alert: Pat Miletich Will Apparently Be Inducted into the UFC Hall of Fame


(Photo via Getty)

Earlier today, MMA Junkie unearthed a rumor about Pat Miletich being inducted into the UFC Hall of Fame.

Their theory? Miletich is one the schedule for the UFC’s fan expo next week in Las Vegas. Do you know what else is also on the schedule? Pat Miletich’s UFC Hall of Fame induction ceremony. So I guess we shouldn’t call it a rumor so much as it’s either fact or one of the UFC’s web design interns made a huge mistake.


(Photo via Getty)

Earlier today, MMA Junkie unearthed a rumor about Pat Miletich being inducted into the UFC Hall of Fame.

Their theory? Miletich is one the schedule for the UFC’s fan expo next week in Las Vegas. Do you know what else is also on the schedule? Pat Miletich’s UFC Hall of Fame induction ceremony. So I guess we shouldn’t call it a rumor so much as it’s either fact or one of the UFC’s web design interns made a huge mistake.

If true, this would be a tremendous boon for the UFC’s Hall of Fame–which is currently little more than Dana White‘s equivalent of a Myspace Top 8 (yes, a Myspace reference). Inducting Miletich–the first-ever UFC welterweight champ and one of the most notable coaches of his day with Miletich Fighting Systems–into the UFC Hall of Fame would bestow some much-needed legitimacy on the institution after White promised to induct the likes of Bobby Southworth and Jason Thacker earlier this month.

And by the way, is it a coincidence that the day CagePotato publishes the 95 Theses of MMA (one of which decries leaving legitimate legends out of the UFC) is the same day we find out about the UFC’s conciliatory nature towards Miletich? We don’t think so…

If/when Miletich is inducted, we’ll be sure to brief you with the details.

20 Years, 20 Head Kicks: A UFC Anniversary Tribute


(Gerard Gordeau delivers the first head-kick TKO in UFC history against Teila Tuli back at UFC 1, which took place exactly 20 years today on November 12th, 1993.)

By Adam Martin

There are literally thousands of ways a mixed martial arts match can end, but one of the most thrilling methods is the head kick knockout.

Over the course of two decades of fights in the UFC Octagon, there have been a number of memorable knockout blows delivered via head kick, and in honor of the UFC’s 20th anniversary, I’ve put together a list of what I believe are the top 20 head kick knockouts in UFC history.

20 years, 20 head kicks. Here we go.

20. Uriah Hall vs. Adam Cella, TUF 17 episode 3 (aired 2/5/13)

I wanted to keep the list strictly to knockouts that happened during live UFC events, but I’m going to bend the rules a bit and kick off the list with one that happened on TUF.

Of course I’m talking about Uriah Hall’s spinning hook kick KO of Adam Cella, which took place earlier this year during TUF 17. It was a devastating knockout that made UFC president Dana White’s hyperbole raise to a whole new level as he declared Hall the nastiest fighter to ever step into the TUF house (the same house that produced Rashad Evans and Forrest Griffin – you know, former UFC champs), and thus the UFC embarked on a social media campaign to play the clip non-stop on every medium in existence.

It was a brutal knockout, and I literally felt sick watching it. Even though Hall never lived up to the massive expectations that were placed on him, his most well-known career highlight deserves a place at #20.

19. Pat Miletich vs. Shonie Carter, UFC 32 (6/29/01)


(Gerard Gordeau delivers the first head-kick TKO in UFC history against Teila Tuli back at UFC 1, which took place exactly 20 years today on November 12th, 1993.)

By Adam Martin

There are literally thousands of ways a mixed martial arts match can end, but one of the most thrilling methods is the head kick knockout.

Over the course of two decades of fights in the UFC Octagon, there have been a number of memorable knockout blows delivered via head kick, and in honor of the UFC’s 20th anniversary, I’ve put together a list of what I believe are the top 20 head kick knockouts in UFC history.

20 years, 20 head kicks. Here we go.

20. Uriah Hall vs. Adam Cella, TUF 17 episode 3 (aired 2/5/13)

I wanted to keep the list strictly to knockouts that happened during live UFC events, but I’m going to bend the rules a bit and kick off the list with one that happened on TUF.

Of course I’m talking about Uriah Hall’s spinning hook kick KO of Adam Cella, which took place earlier this year during TUF 17. It was a devastating knockout that made UFC president Dana White’s hyperbole raise to a whole new level as he declared Hall the nastiest fighter to ever step into the TUF house (the same house that produced Rashad Evans and Forrest Griffin – you know, former UFC champs), and thus the UFC embarked on a social media campaign to play the clip non-stop on every medium in existence.

It was a brutal knockout, and I literally felt sick watching it. Even though Hall never lived up to the massive expectations that were placed on him, his most well-known career highlight deserves a place at #20.

19. Pat Miletich vs. Shonie Carter, UFC 32 (6/29/01)

I couldn’t do a best-of MMA list without sneaking Pat Miletich and Shonie Carter in it, and thankfully they were both involved in the same fight so I get to kill two birds with one stone here.

At UFC 32 in 2001, Miletich fought Carter in a matchup between two of my personal old-school fan favorites. Miletich was coming off a defeat to Carlos Newton where he lost the UFC welterweight championship, while Carter was coming off an amazing spinning backfist KO of Matt Serra, meaning this fight had serious title implications at the time.

But while many predicted a close matchup on paper, the outcome belonged to “The Croatian Sensation” as he hit  “Mr. International” with a head kick so hard it knocked Carter out cold, one of the very rare head kick KOs that took place in the first decade of the Octagon’s existence.

I saw this one on a tape I borrowed from a friend a long time ago and I’ve always wanted to see it again but haven’t had the opportunity to. Fortunately I’ve found a GIF for all of us to enjoy, but if you can track down the entire fight I highly recommend it.

18. Paul Taylor vs. Gabe Ruediger, UFC 126 (2/5/11)

One of the most awesome head kick knockouts in UFC history took place at UFC 126, and no, I’m not talking about the one you’re already thinking of (that will come later). I’m actually talking about the head kick KO that Brit Paul Taylor delivered on Gabe Ruediger, one of the most underrated finishes in UFC history in my opinion and one that I don’t think enough people have seen.

On any other night, Taylor would have claimed a nice $50,000 bonus check for KOTN, but as we all know there was another very good head kick KO that same night. Still, we can give him some props for scoring a classic knockout in what turned out to be his final appearance in the Octagon; Taylor recently announced his retirement from the sport due to a variety of nagging injuries. At least we have this sweet finish to remember him by. (Watch the GIF here.)

17. Georges St-Pierre vs. Matt Hughes, UFC 65 (11/18/06)

Back in 2006, Georges St-Pierre was seen as the future of the UFC welterweight division and at UFC 65 he was able to get his revenge on Matt Hughes (who had earlier submitted St-Pierre with an armbar at UFC 50) when he kicked the Miletich Fighting Systems product in the head and then followed it up with a series of punches on the ground to capture the UFC welterweight title for the fist time in his career.

This head kick is the only part of the fight I really remembered, and I was going to place it higher on the list originally, but since St-Pierre needed the follow-up punches to finish off the job I decided to stick it at #17. Either way, a job well-done by St-Pierre in this fight, and arguably the best finish of his storied career to date. (Watch the GIF here.)

16. Andrew Craig vs. Rafael Natal, UFC on FUEL TV 4 (7/11/12)

One of my favorite fights of all time took place at UFC FUEL TV 4, an unheralded middleweight bout between Andrew Craig and Rafael Natal. I was actually the reporter who first broke news of this fight back when I worked for theScore.com, and so it always holds a special place in my heart for that. But I’ve broken other fight announcements before, and rarely do the final products turn out to be as good as Craig vs. Natal ended up being.

In the fight, Natal was absolutely beating the crap out of Craig and looking like he was going to cruise to a stoppage win, but at the end of the second round, Craig – who was down big on points – threw a booming head kick out of desperation and caught Natal square on the chin, knocking him out cold.

An absolutely insane fight, and an even crazier knockout. Wow. (Watch the GIF here.)

15. Chuck Liddell vs. Renato “Babalu” Sobral, UFC 40 (11/22/02)

Back in his prime, Chuck Liddell was an absolute killer, and at UFC 40 he showed that he wasn’t just a power puncher as he head-kicked Renato “Babalu” Sobral into oblivion to earn a shot at the light heavyweight title.

Despite coming from a karate background, this remains one of only two head kick knockouts in Liddell’s storied MMA career (and his only one in the UFC), so let’s savor it since we’ll never get another one of these from “The Iceman” now that he’s happily retired. (Watch the GIF here.)

14. Junior dos Santos vs. Mark Hunt, UFC 160 (5/25/13)

Mark Hunt is considered by many to have one of the best chins in the history of combat sports, but at UFC 160 Junior dos Santos showed that Hunt is a human being like the rest of us when Cigano spinning wheel kicked Hunt in the temple to knock him to the ground, and then followed it up with a massive punch to put “The Super Samoan” completely out cold.

It was a beautiful, dominant performance by Dos Santos up until the KO, and the finish was just a cherry on top. I still can’t believe that Hunt was finished in this fashion, but then again dos Santos is one of the most powerful punchers the Octagon has ever seen – and, one of the hardest kickers as well, clearly. (Watch the GIF here.)

13. Rory Markham vs. Brodie Farber, UFC Fight Night 14 (7/19/08)

Another knockout that doesn’t get as much love as it should was Rory Markham’s massive head kick KO of Brodie Farber at UFC Fight Night 14. Just watch the GIF and tell me how awesome this is.

It’s too bad that Markham has had so many issues out side of the cage, because when he was in the Octagon he was an absolute killer. But at least he was able to give us this beauty before he rode off into the sunset, and for that we have to give him props.

12. Tim Sylvia vs. Tra Telligman, UFC 54 (8/20/05)

I know Tim Sylvia gets a bad rap from fans these days, but don’t forget that he gave us one of the best head kick knockouts ever witnessed inside the Octagon.

It took place at UFC 54, when Sylvia took on Tracy “Tra” Telligman. Sylvia was coming off a loss to Andrei Arlovski at UFC 51 that cost him a chance to capture the UFC heavyweight title, but after taking Telligman’s head off, Sylvia gained the confidence to make a run up the ladder and eventually capture the belt.

Sylvia has had an underappreciated career and this finish of Telligman is my favorite moment from it. It’s also one of the very few knockouts in UFC history that’s occurred at the 4:59 mark of round one, making it extra special.

11. Alan Belcher vs. Jorge Santiago, UFC Fight Night 7 (12/13/06)

One of my favorite all-time knockouts of any kind took place at UFC Fight Night 7, when a young Alan Belcher took on Jorge Santiago and delivered one of the most damaging head kick finishes in the history of the sport.

I don’t think Santiago was ever the same after this KO, which is a shame because he is a skilled fighter — although he was never able to prove that in the Octagon. As for Belcher, he has had a solid career but there’s no doubt in my mind this is his ultimate career highlight, and it’s for good reason. (Watch the GIF here.)

Ready for the Top 10? Hit that “next page” link and read on…

Eduardo Dantas, Bellator, And the Folly of Letting Your Guys Fight Elsewhere

(Dantas vs. Nam @ Shooto Brazil 33, 8/25/12. Skip to 4:26 for the knockout.)

By Jim Genia

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines “folly” as “lack of good sense or normal prudence and foresight.” Bellator president Bjorn Rebney, however, likely now defines it as making the ridiculous mistake of letting one of his champions fight somewhere else. This past weekend, Bellator bantamweight king Eduardo Dantas was allowed by his American employers to take a fight closer to home in Rio de Janeiro, for the promotion Shooto Brasil. There, he met Oregon-based fighter Tyson Nam — a 12-4 regional competitor and, by all appearances, easy prey. And guess what? Dantas got knocked the heck out in the first round. Yeah, Bellator done goofed.

If there are unwritten rules to promoting MMA events, somewhere near the top of the list has to be “never let your champs fight in other shows.” Because, really, while the reward for said fighter winning is the implication that your organization is superior in terms of the quality of its competitors, the risk is that your guy could get his butt kicked.  In that scenario, what’s implied (or sometimes stated explicitly) is that your fighters suck — or, at the very least, that the fighters in the other shows are better.  And who wants to be the one with the weaker fighters?

Not the UFC, that’s for sure.  Take for instance the failed contract negotiations to get legendary heavyweight legend Fedor Emelianenko into the Octagon, and the alleged stipulation that Fedor, if he signed with the UFC, wouldn’t have been allowed to even compete in sambo tournaments in Mother Russia. Do you think Dana White wants tarnished fighters? He doesn’t even want them losing in something that’s not even mixed martial arts! (Sadly, this wasn’t always policy; see below.)


(Dantas vs. Nam @ Shooto Brazil 33, 8/25/12. Skip to 4:26 for the knockout.)

By Jim Genia

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines “folly” as “lack of good sense or normal prudence and foresight.” Bellator president Bjorn Rebney, however, likely now defines it as making the ridiculous mistake of letting one of his champions fight somewhere else. This past weekend, Bellator bantamweight king Eduardo Dantas was allowed by his American employers to take a fight closer to home in Rio de Janeiro, for the promotion Shooto Brasil. There, he met Oregon-based fighter Tyson Nam — a 12-4 regional competitor and, by all appearances, easy prey. And guess what? Dantas got knocked the heck out in the first round. Yeah, Bellator done goofed.

If there are unwritten rules to promoting MMA events, somewhere near the top of the list has to be “never let your champs fight in other shows.” Because, really, while the reward for said fighter winning is the implication that your organization is superior in terms of the quality of its competitors, the risk is that your guy could get his butt kicked.  In that scenario, what’s implied (or sometimes stated explicitly) is that your fighters suck — or, at the very least, that the fighters in the other shows are better.  And who wants to be the one with the weaker fighters?

Not the UFC, that’s for sure.  Take for instance the failed contract negotiations to get legendary heavyweight legend Fedor Emelianenko into the Octagon, and the alleged stipulation that Fedor, if he signed with the UFC, wouldn’t have been allowed to even compete in sambo tournaments in Mother Russia. Do you think Dana White wants tarnished fighters? He doesn’t even want them losing in something that’s not even mixed martial arts! (Sadly, this wasn’t always policy; see below.)

Of course, Bellator had its reasons for allowing Dantas to do his thing in Brazil. For one, due to Bellator’s reliance on tournaments to anoint top contenders, their champs fight pretty infrequently, and Dantas does have to eat, make car payments, deal with credit card bills, etc.  Therefore, a paycheck that comes maybe twice a year probably doesn’t cut it. So why not let him work a shift somewhere else? Also, Dantas isn’t the first Bellator champ to be allowed to stray; former lightweight pack leader Eddie Alvarez was allowed to compete in DREAM in Japan, and Alvarez came away victorious.

In that example, the Bellator hardware lost none of its luster. But at the end of the day, is the risk worth it?  The answer is “no.” Because right now, everyone is watching YouTube clips of Bellator’s top 135-pound fighter getting put to sleep at some show in South America, and the conclusion those viewers are coming to is that when it comes to bantamweights, Shooto Brasil has got Bellator beat. It’s a guarantee that that’s the last thing Rebney wants. You know what he probably does want right now?  A freakin’ time machine.

Other examples of fighters who belong to one organization taking ill-advised fights in other organizations and paying for their folly include:

  • Chuck Liddell, who, with White in tow, flew to Japan to face Quinton “Rampage” Jackson at the 2003 PRIDE Middleweight Grand Prix semifinals. Granted, earlier that year “the Iceman” had gone from top UFC light-heavyweight contender to grappling dummy for a revitalized Randy Couture, and in PRIDE’s Middleweight Grand Prix quarterfinals, Liddell snuffed out Alistair Overeem. But Liddell was still a very valuable piece in Zuffa’s UFC puzzle at the time, and PRIDE was the UFC’s biggest competitor in the MMA market. Loaning them Liddell was mistake — partially because it allowed Rampage to ground Liddell into hamburger meat, but also because it lent credence to the argument (and at the time, these arguments raged) that PRIDE was better.
  • Shinya Aoki, who was the DREAM lightweight champ when he hopped on a plane, came to the United States, and took on Gilbert Melendez for the Strikeforce belt. Melendez beat the bejeezus out of the Japanese submission wizard for five solid rounds. It was so thorough a drubbing, you can bet at least one lower-level DREAM executive was ordered to commit seppuku for the mistake.
  • You’d think DREAM would’ve learned their lesson with Aoki, but no. No, they didn’t. Hot on the heels of Aoki’s loss, they sent over their second best lightweight in Tatsuya Kawajiri, and this time, Melendez needed only three minutes and fourteen seconds to destroy whatever credibility DREAM’s lightweight division might still have had.
  • Back in the days when SEG owned the UFC and the organization was struggling, reigning champ Pat Miletich was allowed to take a fight in the Hawaiian promotion Superbrawl against Japanese one-trick pony Jutaro Nakao. Unfortunately, that one trick Nakao was really good at was the triangle choke, and once Miletich tapped to it, the UFC had itself a champ who’d fought somewhere else and lost. D’oh. What lessened the blow to the UFC brand was the fact that few people watched the UFC at the time (it was banned from pay-per-view), and even fewer knew what Superbrawl was. Since Miletich’s loss was never acknowledged on air, the proverbial bullet was dodged.
  • Once he won the YAMMA belt, Travis Wiuff should never have been permitted to fight anywhere else.  YAMMA never die!