Jon Jones Likely to Face Daniel Cormier-Anthony Johnson Winner, Says Dana White

Jon Jones may have a nice gift waiting for him when he comes back from his yearlong suspension: a UFC light heavyweight championship fight.
In an interview on the UFC Unfiltered podcast (h/t FoxSports.com’s Damon Martin), UFC President Dana White said …

Jon Jones may have a nice gift waiting for him when he comes back from his yearlong suspension: a UFC light heavyweight championship fight.

In an interview on the UFC Unfiltered podcast (h/t FoxSports.com’s Damon Martin), UFC President Dana White said he expects Jones to face off against the winner of Daniel Cormier’s title defense against Anthony Johnson at UFC 210 on April 8.

“[Jones] is supposed to return around July, so the timing is perfect,” White said. “I haven’t talked to him. I haven’t talked to [Jones] since the whole incident. Depending on where Jon’s head is and where he thinks he is, I would assume he would come right back and try to get his title back.”

In November, the United States Anti-Doping Agency suspended Jones for one year after he tested positive for banned substances. Two estrogen blockers showed up on an out-of-competition drug test from Jones last June.

His suspension began retroactive to July 6, 2016, so he’d be eligible to return to the Octagon this summer.

Jones was set to fight Cormier at UFC 200 on July 9, but UFC removed him from the card following USADA’s notification of his failed drug test. UFC cameras captured the moment White told Cormier of Jones’ infraction (Note: Sequence begins at the 4:13 mark of the video below, and the video contains NSFW language):

Anderson Silva replaced Jones on the card, and Cormier earned a unanimous decision.

White’s stance on Jones appears to have softened in recent months. He told TMZ Sports in November that he wasn’t speaking to the former lightweight champion. Shortly thereafter, he said on the Jim Rome Show (via Martin) that he couldn’t envision Jones in the main event of a pay-per-view anytime soon.

I would never take the risk of headlining a show with [Jones] again,” White said. “I’d put him on the card, but I wouldn’t headline with him until he can consistently get back on track.”

A rematch between Cormier and Jones in particular would put White’s resolve to the test. Even with Jones out of action for over a year—his last fight was against Ovince Saint Preux last April—fans would be clamoring to see him and Cormier finally face off again.

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Top 10 UFC Fights That Ended With Huge Stoppages

As the biggest mixed martial arts (MMA) promotion of all time, the UFC has whipped up some huge fights in its history with some of the baddest men on the planet going head-to-head against one another. Some fights between two top competitors don’t quite live up to the hype, however, as the bout ends up

The post Top 10 UFC Fights That Ended With Huge Stoppages appeared first on LowKick MMA.

As the biggest mixed martial arts (MMA) promotion of all time, the UFC has whipped up some huge fights in its history with some of the baddest men on the planet going head-to-head against one another.

Some fights between two top competitors don’t quite live up to the hype, however, as the bout ends up putting fight fans to sleep rather than keeping them on the edge of their seat for 25 minutes or less.

Then, once in a blue moon, we get a fight that not only lives up to the hype, but exceeds it tremendously. That, my friends, is what we have compiled for you today, the top 10 biggest fights in UFC history that have ended with historic finishes. Let’s begin……

fabricio-werdum-submission10. Cain Velasquez vs. Fabricio Werdum UFC – 188

We kick off our list in the big boys’ division, where two of the most dangerous heavyweights of all time clashed for the biggest prize in MMA.

Coming off of nearly a two-year layoff from the sport, Cain Velasquez would attempt to unify his title with the then-interim heavyweight champ Fabricio Werdum who was on a five-fight win streak.

The opening rounds were a bit back-and-forth and the arena in Mexico City was hot for their native Velasquez, however, the altitude proved to be too much for ‘Cardio Cain’ to handle as he gassed out in the third round.

Velasquez then shot in for a takedown on the Brazilian jiu-jitsu specialist and was immediately wrapped up in a nasty guillotine choke. Velasquez had no other choice but to tap out and make Werdum the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world.

The post Top 10 UFC Fights That Ended With Huge Stoppages appeared first on LowKick MMA.

Top 10 Most Anticipated Rematches In UFC History

Fight week is well underway here at LowKickMMA, as fight fans are on the edges of their seats waiting for the blockbuster UFC 202 card which is slated to take place this weekend (Sat., August 20, 2016) live on pay-per-view (PPV) from the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. The card has been filled out

The post Top 10 Most Anticipated Rematches In UFC History appeared first on LowKick MMA.

Fight week is well underway here at LowKickMMA, as fight fans are on the edges of their seats waiting for the blockbuster UFC 202 card which is slated to take place this weekend (Sat., August 20, 2016) live on pay-per-view (PPV) from the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. The card has been filled out quite nicely from top to bottom, but it’s safe to say that all eyes are on the main event: a highly-anticipated rematch between Nate Diaz and featherweight champion Conor McGregor.

As arguably the biggest fight of the year approaches, it’s an interesting time to take a look back at 10 of the most anticipated rematches in promotional history:

The post Top 10 Most Anticipated Rematches In UFC History appeared first on LowKick MMA.

Finally, A Rational Explanation for Why Chad Mendes vs. Cody McKenzie Was Booked at UFC 148


(“Based on the odor, I would say this man’s been dead for three days.” / Photo via MMAFighting)

Our old bro Ben Fowlkes has written an in-depth double-interview feature-thingy on the UFC’s dynamic matchmaking duo of Joe Silva and Sean Shelby. If you want to learn more about how these guys operate, where they came from, and what they consider to be worst part of their job, give it a read. Personally, our favorite part is this bit in which Sean Shelby reveals the truth behind a baffling UFC mystery — how the hell was the epic UFC 148 squash-match between Chad Mendes vs. Cody McKenzie booked in the first place? Dig it:

[W]hen McKenzie wanted to come down [to featherweight], initially Shelby wasn’t sure he could use him. Then Bart Palaszewski pulled out of a fight with Mendes, and suddenly the situation changed.

“What people don’t understand is, it’s not like I could just remove Chad from the card and say, ‘Sorry, I can get you a fight four months from now,'” Shelby said. “We understand. You spent money on a camp. You’ve got bills to pay. We will do our best to find you a fight. I bend over backward to keep guys in fights, to keep the machine moving. You have to.”

That’s another part of the process that outsiders don’t always get, Silva and Shelby said. Fighters are promised a certain number of fights within a certain number of months. Keep them on the sidelines too long, and the UFC could be in breach of contract. Beyond that, they’d also risk turning the UFC into the kind of promotion they hate.


(“Based on the odor, I would say this man’s been dead for three days.” / Photo via MMAFighting)

Our old bro Ben Fowlkes has written an in-depth double-interview feature-thingy on the UFC’s dynamic matchmaking duo of Joe Silva and Sean Shelby. If you want to learn more about how these guys operate, where they came from, and what they consider to be worst part of their job, give it a read. Personally, our favorite part is this bit in which Sean Shelby reveals the truth behind a baffling UFC mystery — how the hell was the epic UFC 148 squash-match between Chad Mendes vs. Cody McKenzie booked in the first place? Dig it:

[W]hen McKenzie wanted to come down [to featherweight], initially Shelby wasn’t sure he could use him. Then Bart Palaszewski pulled out of a fight with Mendes, and suddenly the situation changed.

“What people don’t understand is, it’s not like I could just remove Chad from the card and say, ‘Sorry, I can get you a fight four months from now,’” Shelby said. “We understand. You spent money on a camp. You’ve got bills to pay. We will do our best to find you a fight. I bend over backward to keep guys in fights, to keep the machine moving. You have to.”

That’s another part of the process that outsiders don’t always get, Silva and Shelby said. Fighters are promised a certain number of fights within a certain number of months. Keep them on the sidelines too long, and the UFC could be in breach of contract. Beyond that, they’d also risk turning the UFC into the kind of promotion they hate.

“You hear fighters [in other organizations] complain, ‘I haven’t fought in eight months, and they won’t return my calls,’” Silva said. “We don’t want to be like that, but to do that we have to keep a tight rein on how many people you have under contract.”

Ideally, the UFC would like to have most fighters stepping in the cage once every four months or so, for an average of three fights a year. Injuries only complicate the picture, especially when you’re trying to find a replacement to face one of the division’s top fighters, which was exactly the situation Shelby faced with Mendes.

“I can’t pull people out of other matches to fix this one,” Shelby said. “Then you’re just kicking the can down the road. But imagine trying to get someone to fight Chad Mendes on two weeks’ or even a month’s notice.”

Then Shelby’s phone rang. It was McKenzie.

“He called me, and I remember this very well, and he said, ‘I want to commit to 145 (pounds),’” Shelby recalled. “I told him I didn’t have any room, but I do have this one opening. I told him, ‘I don’t think you should take this fight, but…’”

You can imagine where it went from there. McKenzie’s a fighter, after all. He jumped on the opening, all but pleading with Shelby to give him the fight. Shelby was reluctant at first, he said, but, “I had nobody.”

“I mean, nobody,” he said. “It’s not like I can sign some random guy. I’ve already got all the top 10 in the world [at 145 pounds]. I had no other choices.”

And so the fight got made, McKenzie got dropped with a body shot, and Shelby got the blame. That’s how it goes when you’re a matchmaker. With the benefit of hindsight, everyone’s an expert. They’ll all say they knew exactly how it was going to go down and you’d have to be an idiot to make that fight in the first place.

We’d imagine that Mendes’s follow-up booking against Yaotzin Meza must have resulted from a similarly desperate situation, but that, friends, is a story for another day.

Oh Great, Now Tito Ortiz Thinks the UFC Rigged His Retirement Fight at UFC 148


(*sniffle*…and then…and then the bad man told me that i would never amount to anything, and that I had a big, stupid face…*begins bawling hysterically*) 

Tito Ortiz is to conspiracy theories what Wilmer Valderrama is to “Yo Momma” jokes. A fun fact: After slipping on a patch of ice in his driveway and bruising his tailbone as a child, Tito Ortiz convinced himself that the residual water was left behind by an opposing wrestling team in an effort to take him out of the competition. Twenty-some odd years later…crab people. The HAARP Machine? Started by Ortiz to explain his loss to Frank Shamrock at UFC 22Zeitgeist? A Tito Ortiz production attempting to write off his performance at UFC 44. And don’t even get Tito started on that completely flawed Magic Loogie theory.

Anyways, we haven’t heard much from Tito since he dropped a close decision to longtime rival Forrest Griffin in his retirement fight at UFC 148. Unfortunately, Ortiz recently emerged from hiding to take one final dump on the promotion that made him the man he is today (and a boatload of cash to boot), throwing everyone from Joe Rogan to Dana White under the bus along the way.

Video after the jump. 


(*sniffle*…and then…and then the bad man told me that i would never amount to anything, and that I had a big, stupid face…*begins bawling hysterically*) 

Tito Ortiz is to conspiracy theories what Wilmer Valderrama is to “Yo Momma” jokes. A fun fact: After slipping on a patch of ice in his driveway and bruising his tailbone as a child, Tito Ortiz convinced himself that the residual water was left behind by an opposing wrestling team in an effort to take him out of the competition. Twenty-some odd years later…crab people. The HAARP Machine? Started by Ortiz to explain his loss to Frank Shamrock at UFC 22Zeitgeist? A Tito Ortiz production attempting to write off his performance at UFC 44. And don’t even get Tito started on that completely flawed Magic Loogie theory.

Anyways, we haven’t heard much from Tito since he dropped a close decision to longtime rival Forrest Griffin in his retirement fight at UFC 148. Unfortunately, Ortiz recently emerged from hiding to take one final dump on the promotion that made him the man he is today (and a boatload of cash to boot), throwing everyone from Joe Rogan to Dana White under the bus along the way.

Video after the jump. 

For your entertainment/convenience, we’ve provided a transcript of Ortiz’s latest conspiracy below (starts around the 4:40 mark, via GroundandPoundTV) along with our running commentary:

I thought I won the fight. When you drop a guy twice, when you take a guy down four times and you dominate by doing it…he never took me down, he never hurt me. 

Fair enough; you think you won the fight, and you cited a few examples to make your case. So far, so good, although the “he never hurt me” mantra is about as used up as, well…

Go back and watch the fight. For the first time ever in UFC history, they showed strikes attempted. Not strikes landed, strikes attempted. When do you ever show someone with strikes attempted?

My guess would be when you land roughly half as many strikes of your opponent and are so gassed by the end of the third round that you are using your face to block said opponent’s punches.

He never hit me, I blocked all of them. I checked all of his kicks. 

Well that, that is just an outright lie. For proof of this, follow either of the links in the previous paragraph.

And I listen to Joe Rogan and it was like a one-sided fight that he was watching. I gave him shit on the phone one time because of it and when we did the podcast he kind of side-winded around it and never got to those questions. But he said, “Look at the leg kicks that Forrest is hitting him with.” I checked all of them. My shin, I had a chipped bone on the tip of it because I checked all of his kicks.  

True, Joe Rogan has come under fire for his “biased” commentary on several occasions, but it should be known that what Tito Ortiz considers a chipped bone is what the rest of us consider a “boo-boo.”

…and after [Forrest ran] out of the fight, that shows that he lost. 

*checking unified rules of mixed martial arts* Nope, it doesn’t. It’s kind of like how the judges don’t pick a winner based on who raises their hands first after a fight either.

…and for Dana to go back and run and get him and to come back, there’s something fishy going on here. How does Dana know how the match is gonna turn out? I thought something was fishy about that. Was it premeditated? Was it pre………….planned out, what the answer was gonna be? If I didn’t knock him out or submit him, they knew who was gonna win. And it’s too bad for my fans. 

You know, all Tito needs are a few more public speaking classes and a sweet rattail and we’ve got ourselves a future TruTV host. And you have to love how he tacks on the “for my fans” spiel at the end to ensure that no one forgets that awesome new nickname of his.

 It bothered me really bad, but I went out the way I wanted to. I went out swinging, I went out on my shield and I held my shield up like no other. 

This just in: Tito Ortiz to host a seminar this summer. The topic: Using repetitive metaphors and confusing non-sequiturs to make your point.

Ortiz goes on to make his usual list of post-fight excuses: bum knee, ruptured disks, new injuries that prevented him from training, etc. before stating that “he doesn’t look for excuses.” They sure seem to find him, though.

Excuses: They’re great, as long as you don’t think about them.

J. Jones

Anderson Silva vs. Chael Sonnen and the Sweetest Revenge Moments in UFC History

Revenge is a dish best served cold.When it’s served in the UFC, I recommend cold, with a side of face punching.Since the very first show in 1993, revenge has consistently been one of the UFC’s top storylines. But Ken Shamrock’s pursuit of vengeance aga…

Revenge is a dish best served cold.

When it’s served in the UFC, I recommend cold, with a side of face punching.

Since the very first show in 1993, revenge has consistently been one of the UFC’s top storylines. But Ken Shamrock’s pursuit of vengeance against Royce Gracie was just the first of many revenge subplots to come.

This year has been a revenge lover’s dream—and considering The Count of Monte Cristo is my favorite book of all time, I feel qualified to say it doesn’t get much sweeter than Anderson Silva silencing Chael Sonnen and Jon Jones vanquishing his mentor Rashad Evans.

Sonnen, as you may recall, absolutely savaged Silva in the press for two years. He talked about his country, his manhood, his friends and even his wife. It was brutal. Silva, of course, had the last word, not only finishing Chael in the cage, but clowning him afterwards, even inviting him to a barbecue. It was the definition of “owned.”

Amazingly, things were even more personal between Evans and Jones. The two had been training partners at Greg Jackson’s gym in New Mexico, where Evans had taken Jones under his wing.

Things escalated quickly, however, when Jones suggested in the press that he’d be willing to fight Evans, breaking gym protocol and the friendship. When the two met at UFC 145, it was not just for the belt. It was to settle a legitimate score.

Have a sweet revenge moment you prefer? A story of your own? Let us hear it in the comments.

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