Breaking: Nick Diaz Reportedly Arrested In Las Vegas

It appears Nick Diaz has been arrested in Las Vegas for some nefarious charges…

The post Breaking: Nick Diaz Reportedly Arrested In Las Vegas appeared first on LowKickMMA.com.

Nick Diaz has allegedly been arrested for domestic battery by strangulation in Las Vegas, according to police records.

Diaz hasn’t been active at all of late, having last competed at UFC 183 back in 2015. Rumors about Diaz placed him in Vegas going to different boxing gyms.

However, any perceived return could be held up by his recent arrest, news of which came from FrontRowBrian on Twitter:

It’s still unclear as of Friday afternoon who was the victim, and the elder Diaz brother hasn’t commented on it. FrontRowBrian did state the Diaz named in the arrest record was Diaz’ age and that he is often in Las Vegas.

A follow-up call to the Clark County Detention Center confirmed to LowKick MMA that a man with his name and exact birthdate of August 2, 1983, was indeed in custody.

Officer Larry Hadfield of the LVMPD office of public information told MMAjunkie that the alleged victim was female. Hadfield said officers responded to a call and were dispatched to a Las Vegas residence at approximately 7:20 p.m. PT., according to MMA Junkie.

The person with knowledge of the case told MMAjunkie that 12 units were dispatched to the scene, the alleged victim was transported to a local hospital and Diaz was combative with officers during his arrest.

The news broke Friday morning at 9:00 a.m., with Diaz being held on $15k bail for the strangulation charge and $3k bail for domestic battery.

Stay tuned as this story develops!

The post Breaking: Nick Diaz Reportedly Arrested In Las Vegas appeared first on LowKickMMA.com.

Ashlee Evans-Smith Tests Positive for Diuretic, Manager Offers Batsh*t Crazy Explanation


(“I’ll ask you one final time, Ashlee, HAVE. YOU. MOVED. TO METRO?” Photo via Getty.) 

Perhaps the biggest problem with the UFC’s current expansion rate — you know, other than the watered-down cards, the recycled marketing gimmicks, and the spreading of those watered-down cards across 5 different platforms — is how often their “event a week” schedule almost inherently undermines the legitimacy of their product. With so many cards to fill a year, the UFC needs every last fighter on their roster to stay healthy in order to keep things afloat, and when a fighter inevitably gets injured, the promotion is forced to hire an outside gun — often on short notice — whom they expect to not only make weight and put on a show, but do so without any…how do I put this…”help.” All for a glorious 8k/8k paycheck if they’re lucky.

Case in point: Ashlee Evans-Smith, who was called up to the UFC on less than a month’s notice to face Raquel Pennington at UFC 181 after Holly Holm went down with an injury. Having not fought since July, the task of making weight in such a short time would be a difficult one for Smith (especially if she wasn’t training), but a concern worth turning down the biggest fight of her young career? NOT UNLESS YOU’RE LOOKING TO GET BLACKBALLED, SWEETHEART.

So Evans-Smith accepted the fight and was able to make weight for her debut (which sadly ended in heartbreak/near decapitation), but surprise surprise, it looks like she might have needed a little of the aforementioned help in order to do so…


(“I’ll ask you one final time, Ashlee, HAVE. YOU. MOVED. TO METRO?” Photo via Getty.) 

Perhaps the biggest problem with the UFC’s current expansion rate — you know, other than the watered-down cards, the recycled marketing gimmicks, and the spreading of those watered-down cards across 5 different platforms — is how often their “event a week” schedule almost inherently undermines the legitimacy of their product. With so many cards to fill a year, the UFC needs every last fighter on their roster to stay healthy in order to keep things afloat, and when a fighter inevitably gets injured, the promotion is forced to hire an outside gun — often on short notice — whom they expect to not only make weight and put on a show, but do so without any…how do I put this…”help.” All for a glorious 8k/8k paycheck if they’re lucky.

Case in point: Ashlee Evans-Smith, who was called up to the UFC on less than a month’s notice to face Raquel Pennington at UFC 181 after Holly Holm went down with an injury. Having not fought since July, the task of making weight in such a short time would be a difficult one for Smith (especially if she wasn’t training), but a concern worth turning down the biggest fight of her young career? NOT UNLESS YOU’RE LOOKING TO GET BLACKBALLED, SWEETHEART.

So Evans-Smith accepted the fight and was able to make weight for her debut (which sadly ended in heartbreak/near decapitation), but surprise surprise, it looks like she might have needed a little of the aforementioned help in order to do so.

According to MMAJunkie, Smith’s tested positive for “diuretics” following her loss to Pennington and will now face up to a six-month suspension when NSAC meets next week. Not that the Nevada State Athletic Commission has bothered to inform her or her camp of this:

Manager Mike McLeish first learned that his client, Ashlee Evans-Smith (3-1 MMA, 0-1 UFC), had failed a drug test when a UFC executive called him.

McLeish was told Evans-Smith faced a six-month suspension and needed to assemble a list of supplements to present to the commission, which would be calling him shortly.

That call never came, he said Tuesday night. He said neither he or Evans-Smith have received any written notice of a rule violation. Yet Evans-Smith showed up on an agenda for an NSAC meeting scheduled next week in Las Vegas.

Wait, you’re telling me that the Nevada State Athletic Commission dropped the ball regarding a fighter’s drug test? Well now I’ve seen everything!!

But even crazier than NSAC’s inability to take a piss without dribbling on its shoes is the explanation Evans-Smith’s manager gave for her positive test:

She takes flowers, weird sh-t. It could possibly be that. 

Wow. If you ever wanted proof that literally anyone can become an MMA manager, look no further than this grade-A defense (see also: Kogan, M.).

While looking over Evans-Smith’s case, I am oddly reminded of Kevin Casey, another fighter who was called up to the UFC on short notice, only to be popped for steroids following his victory at UFC 175. It’s almost as if the UFC is expanding at a rate at which their roster cannot support. Weird. In any case, I look forward to hearing how proud the UFC is of Evans-Smith once she checks into rehab for flower addiction.

J. Jones

The UFC 178-181 PPV Buyrate Estimates Are About as ‘Meh’ as You’d Expect


(Pretending that Mighty Mouse wasn’t headlining the card may have been a brilliant marketing strategy — but it wasn’t enough to make UFC 178 a success.)

Reddit user thisisdanitis passes along the latest UFC pay-per-view buyrate estimates from Dave Meltzer’s Wrestling Observer newsletter, which provide more proof that the UFC’s PPV business just ain’t what it used to be. Here we go…

UFC 178 (Johnson-Cariaso, Cerrone-Alvarez, McGregor-Poirier): 205,000 buys

UFC 179 (Aldo vs. Mendes): 160,000-200,000 buys

UFC 180 (Werdum vs. Hunt): 185,000-200,000 buys

UFC 181 (Hendricks vs. Lawler, Pettis vs. Melendez): 380,000 (This is an early number and may change somewhat based on late reporting cable systems.)

The UFC 178 estimate is the most surprising to me, because the event was so highly anticipated among hardcore MMA fans as a “stacked” card with Event of the Year potential, and it still barely broke 200k. Of course, casual fans only look at the main event, and Demetrious Johnson is basically the worst PPV draw on the roster.

It’s almost as surprising that UFC 180 performed as well as it did, considering that the card had no stars outside of the main event. And 380,000 buys for UFC 181 is very good, relatively speaking. That’s like the equivalent of 650,000 buys in 2009.


(Pretending that Mighty Mouse wasn’t headlining the card may have been a brilliant marketing strategy — but it wasn’t enough to make UFC 178 a success.)

Reddit user thisisdanitis passes along the latest UFC pay-per-view buyrate estimates from Dave Meltzer’s Wrestling Observer newsletter, which provide more proof that the UFC’s PPV business just ain’t what it used to be. Here we go…

UFC 178 (Johnson-Cariaso, Cerrone-Alvarez, McGregor-Poirier): 205,000 buys

UFC 179 (Aldo vs. Mendes): 160,000-200,000 buys

UFC 180 (Werdum vs. Hunt): 185,000-200,000 buys

UFC 181 (Hendricks vs. Lawler, Pettis vs. Melendez): 380,000 (This is an early number and may change somewhat based on late reporting cable systems.)

The UFC 178 estimate is the most surprising to me, because the event was so highly anticipated among hardcore MMA fans as a “stacked” card with Event of the Year potential, and it still barely broke 200k. Of course, casual fans only look at the main event, and Demetrious Johnson is basically the worst PPV draw on the roster.

It’s almost as surprising that UFC 180 performed as well as it did, considering that the card had no stars outside of the main event. And 380,000 buys for UFC 181 is very good, relatively speaking. That’s like the equivalent of 650,000 buys in 2009.

The UFC’s next three PPVs should pull the promotion’s buyrates out of the garbage, at least. UFC 182: Jones vs. Cormier and UFC 183: Silva vs. Diaz have massive main events (but thin supporting cards), and UFC 184 features the double title-fight punch of Weidman vs. Belfort and Rousey vs. Zingano. So where will the buyrates for those cards end up? And if more than one of them falls below 500k, will the UFC just give up and focus its business on novelty barbecue equipment?

UFC Rankings: Good Calls and Bad Calls Following UFC 181

It’s been a long and winding road for Robbie Lawler, but he reached the top of the welterweight division with a narrow decision victory over Johny Hendricks at UFC 181 on Saturday.
Lawler wasn’t dominant, but he did more damage and defended 12 takedown…

It’s been a long and winding road for Robbie Lawler, but he reached the top of the welterweight division with a narrow decision victory over Johny Hendricks at UFC 181 on Saturday.

Lawler wasn’t dominant, but he did more damage and defended 12 takedown attempts. Hendricks fell short on two scorecards, but his five takedowns resulted in most MMA media members believing he should have retained the 170-pound championship, according to MMADecisions.com.

While the decision could have gone either way, Lawler again proved he’s one of the best in the world. Was his performance enough to earn him a spot in the pound-for-pound UFC rankings?

Here are the latest official UFC rankings, via UFC.com, which are voted on by several MMA media members.

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Khabib Nurmagomedov on What Melendez Did Wrong and How He’ll Beat Pettis

Second-ranked Gilbert Melendez tried to contain the sensational striking chops of Anthony Pettis with bell-to-bell pressure in their lightweight title tilt at UFC 181 on Saturday.
Unfortunately for El Nino, his pressure-at-all-cost approach landed him …

Second-ranked Gilbert Melendez tried to contain the sensational striking chops of Anthony Pettis with bell-to-bell pressure in their lightweight title tilt at UFC 181 on Saturday.

Unfortunately for El Nino, his pressure-at-all-cost approach landed him in a precarious position in the second round, which ended with him tapping out for the first time in his career.

He may have been slightly impressed with Pettis‘ performance, but the way top-ranked Khabib Nurmagomedov sees it, he won’t have the same issues with the champion

During an interview this week with Sherdog.com, Nurmagomedov talked about what makes him a threat to Pettis‘ throne:

My wrestling is [on a] different level. Gilbert Melendez is a very experienced guy, good boxing, good heart, good chin. A lot of respect for Gilbert Melendez, but if I have fight versus Anthony Pettis, I think I pressure him, hard punch, go takedown [and] top control. I think he no like this. You see Gilbert Melendez take him down and pressure him, but if Khabib Nurmagomedov vs. Anthony Pettis fight, I think l am dominating. He have only [a] lucky punch knockout. His kicks are very good, his boxing is not bad, it’s okay, he’s a striking guy, I like this. If you have [a] striking opponent, you need to pressure it.

When asked if he thought Melendez had devised a proper game plan, which he simply didn’t execute against Pettis, Nurmagomedov answered with the following: 

No, no. I [don’t] think this. I think he try, try, try takedown. He tired. But he need [to] catch his leg [and] takedown. It’s very easy. Catch his leg, takedown, top control. Catch his leg, takedown, top control.

Nurmagomedov, who tore his right meniscus in July, said he’ll be ready to fight in the spring and that he’d prefer to fight Showtime for the belt in his first bout back.

That is, unless Pettis takes another 15-month layoff.

Pettis, in the meantime, threw water on the notion that an apparent injury to his left hand suffered in the Melendez fight will sideline him for any significant stretch of time via Twitter on Monday. 

Nurmagomedov has racked up a 22-0 record with seven knockouts and eight submissions since turning pro in 2008.

A 26-year-old Russian grappling specialist, Nurmagomedov has amassed a 6-0 mark in the UFC with one submission and one TKO.

Pettis (18-2) improved to 5-1 in the UFC and 10-2 under the Zuffa banner. He has finished each of his last four fights, with his last two wins coming via submission in lightweight title fights. 

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Tony Ferguson’s Message to LW Divisional Elite: ‘I’m Coming for That Top Spot’

When a fighter comes into their own, special things start to happen, and that is what 2014 has been about for Tony Ferguson. 
Since entering the UFC by winning season 13 of The Ultimate Fighter, “El Cucuy” has been on a constant push to progress h…

When a fighter comes into their own, special things start to happen, and that is what 2014 has been about for Tony Ferguson. 

Since entering the UFC by winning season 13 of The Ultimate Fighter, “El Cucuy” has been on a constant push to progress his skills as a mixed martial artist and scrap his way to elite-level status. Ferguson has been out to prove he’s the real deal inside the Octagon and the 30-year-old lightweight has been putting up high-caliber performances to back up that notion.

The scrappy California native has won six of his seven showings since entering the talent-stacked ranks of the UFC’s 155-pound fold back in 2011 and he shows zero signs of slowing down. Ferguson has notched four consecutive victories in the past two years, with his most recent win coming at the expense of heavy-handed slugger Abel Trujillo at UFC 181 last Saturday.

While “Killa” found a home for his power in the early going and put Ferguson on the mat, the surging prospect proved resilient and rebounded strong to score the second-round finish. By scoring the comeback victory over Trujillo, he showed there’s a lot of heart to go along with this ever-improving skill set, and Ferguson believes that’s going to cause problems for anyone he faces inside the Octagon.

“It was a good fight and one that I expected,” Ferguson told Bleacher Report. “I weathered the storm, brought my technique and proved myself. I just don’t want to be questioned anymore about where I belong. I belong in the top 15 or in the top 10. I belong in the spot where I’m going to be at. Nothing has been given to me and I’ve definitely earned this. This is all the result of the time spent in the gym and even outside of the gym from eating correctly and proper recovery. Planning my next practice session and listening to my body and my coaches.

“It goes a long way and I’m really prepared and amped up for 2015. I’m not going to take a big long break. I’m not injured. I’m mentally and physically sound. I’m just ready to see who they put in front of me.

While his win over Trujillo was an impressive performance from the former TUF winner, it’s not one he’s willing to rest on. And even though the victory failed to put him into a top-15 ranking in the latest UFC poll, it is just another detail that is of little concern to him at the present time. Ferguson is taking aim at the biggest names in the division and is willing to travel any road he has to in order to get to the lightweight crown.

If the rest of his division is sleeping on him, then all the better in Ferguson’s mind, but it’s something they will have to figure out soon enough, because they won’t have a choice when he’s standing across the Octagon from them. And that is what he believes is going to be the biggest challenge for all of his future opponents.

“People just don’t know,” Ferguson said. “They don’t know what to think about me. I’m not the type to worry about who I’m going to fight, but these guys are like, ‘Man, how are we going to take this guy out?’ I’ve taken out a lot of these guys from these top gyms and I like that. 

“I mess up these guys’ thought processes. That’s what I do. When these guys are watching film on me I hope put fear in them when they watch it. They are going to go all the way back to when I fought Justin Edwards and see where I knocked him out from off my back. Other fights I’ve weathered the storm then came back to beat the guy up until the ref stopped the fight. It just keeps going on and on. When I keep a level head and go in there with a game plan, regardless if the plan works, I know how to improvise. I know how to come out with that victory and I’ve always been that way.

“This is the MMA game and it’s just like chess,” he added. “It starts right before you get in there, and if you can keep a level head and rely on your technique once the fight starts, that’s how I win. I can get pissed off during a fight—and trust me, I’ll still win—but I choose to keep a level head and that’s when you are going to see great things. The more I’m in there, the easier it gets for me to relax. As soon as 2015 hits, I’d like to sign on the dotted line and get back in there right away.”

With Ferguson running the proverbial table in 2014 and taking out notable competition the likes of Danny Castillo and Abel Trujillo along the way, there will certainly be bigger matchups waiting for him in the New Year. The lightweight division is constantly referred to as a “shark tank” for the amount of high-caliber talent that dwells in the 155-pound waters, and Ferguson is making zero bones about his intention to gun for the biggest names out there.

While he’s on the cusp of breaking through into the coveted top-10 rankings of the lightweight fold, Ferguson is already letting the fighters atop the divisional hierarchy know he’s coming after them. It may take him a few fights to get to current champion Anthony Pettis, but that’s a road he’s happy to travel. And if that particular path happens to include undefeated Russian sensation Khabib Nurmagomedov, then that’s work he’ll also enjoy getting into.

When it all boils down, Ferguson is simply determined to make sure the fighters currently hovering in the lightweight division’s upper tier know that he’s on his way up, and he’s bringing a fight to each and every one of their front doors.

“I called it at the press conference,” Ferguson said regarding the message he sent to Pettis and company at the post-fight press conference for UFC 181. “I told him to keep that belt warm for me. He knows who he is. It’s the same thing for Khabib [Nurmagomedov]. These guys know I’m coming for them. We are on different pathways right now and everyone is searching for their own thing, but I’m here. Don’t sleep on me because I’m coming for that top spot.”

 

Duane Finley is a featured columnist for Bleacher Report. All quotes are obtained firsthand unless noted otherwise.

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