UFC 149: Faber vs. Barao — Live Results & Commentary



(I have nothing funny to say about the Faber/Barao face-off, but oh man, does Shawn Jordan look like the human embodiment of a penis crawling back up inside a body or what? / Photos via the UFC 149 weigh-in gallery on MMAFighting.com.)

Tonight’s UFC 149 card in Calgary will answer several burning questions. For instance, can Urijah Faber keep his spot as the #1 bantamweight contender — and earn a relatively meaningless interim title belt in the process — or will the red-hot Renan BaraoRao bump him out of line? Will Hector Lombard‘s trail of destruction continue in the Octagon, or is redneck judo the antidote to actual judo? (Sub-question: If Lombard wins, will his post-fight interview be awkward as hell?) And how many points will Cheick Kongo be docked during his fight with rookie Shawn Jordan? Excited yet? No? Well fucking get excited, okay?

Live round-by-round results from the “Faber vs. Barao” PPV main card will be piling up after the jump starting at 10 p.m. ET, courtesy of defending liveblog champion Anthony Gannon. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and whenever you see something ill, type “Whoa” in the comments section.



(I have nothing funny to say about the Faber/Barao face-off, but oh man, does Shawn Jordan look like the human embodiment of a penis crawling back up inside a body or what? / Photos via the UFC 149 weigh-in gallery on MMAFighting.com.)

Tonight’s UFC 149 card in Calgary will answer several burning questions. For instance, can Urijah Faber keep his spot as the #1 bantamweight contender — and earn a relatively meaningless interim title belt in the process — or will the red-hot Renan BaraoRao bump him out of line? Will Hector Lombard‘s trail of destruction continue in the Octagon, or is redneck judo the antidote to actual judo? (Sub-question: If Lombard wins, will his post-fight interview be awkward as hell?) And how many points will Cheick Kongo be docked during his fight with rookie Shawn Jordan? Excited yet? No? Well fucking get excited, okay?

Live round-by-round results from the “Faber vs. Barao” PPV main card will be piling up after the jump starting at 10 p.m. ET, courtesy of defending liveblog champion Anthony Gannon. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and whenever you see something ill, type “Whoa” in the comments section.

Sup, Potatoheads. And here we are, UFC 149, yet another card I volunteered to liveblog that the injury gods decided to go and get all medieval on with a pair of pliers and a blowtorch. Dominick Cruz and Urijah Faber were supposed to settle up their trilogy of hatred. The stakes were high, with not only dominion on the line, but the loser would have had to allow the winner to sleep with his girlfriend, and give him a foot massage, and not be tickling or nothin’. Gimme a break, yo, Pulp Fiction was on before. But anyway, Cruz went down, so now it’s Faber vs Renan Barao for a fake interim title. Sexiyama was supposed to suffer his fifth straight loss to Thiago Alves. That aint happening. Shogun was supposed to welcome Thiago Silva back from a suspension for submitting a non-human urinalysis. Nothing doing. Silva is out and Shogun will now face Brandon Vera in a couple of weeks. Vitor, Bisping, Big Nog, all had to bang out with injuries. Wtf. WTF!!!!!

They say shitty things happen in three’s. And for the most part that’s true. Last year my cat ran away, my girlfriend slept with a guy I know who has much bigger hands than I do, and a guy at work I had publicly referred to as a “twat” was promoted higher than me.  Suffice to say it was not a very good year. This is my second jinxed card in a row now. If there’s a third, I’m quitting, changing my name to Lance, marrying a girl with a bunch of shit in her face, and selling high-grade heroin out of my house.

Still though, for all the brutal ravaging this card went through, it’s still pretty decent. I don’t feel nearly as violated as I did when I hit the “Buy” button for UFC 147. Making that purchase was about as much fun as sharing a single shower head with four other dudes, which I’m not ashamed to say I know a little something about (in boot camp you freaks). It’s just a chaotic scene. There are parts flying this way and that, dudes with soap in their eyes jockeying for position, and in such a disorderly situation, things happen – things that the decorum of Cage Potato dictates not be spoken aloud.

Anyway, let’s do this thing.

First up is Matt Riddle vs Chris Clements

Riddle is rockin’ some serious hair. Trust me, if there’s one thing in this world I know its bad hair. I went from a gigantic orange afro, right about the time that the movie Annie came out (you can imagine how magical those formative years were for me), to the prerequisite awful hair of the 80’s, to the white-boy fade of the 90’s, to the Marine Corps high and tight, to my current state of baldness – not in any sort of American History X kind of way, mind you, just an unkind genetic predisposition. So I get rough hair, and Riddle is sporting some serious locks tonight.

Respect though for coming out to Iron Butterfly.

DAYUM, Clements rolls out to “Rocking Robin.” I’m not quite sure what to make of this.

Round 1: Rachelle Leah is back and that’s pretty freakin’ great. Clements threatens with a hook, backs off. Riddle misses a jab. Riddle with a single leg, scores a trip takedown. Clements up, but eats a couple shots. Riddle with a right hook, then a kick to the ribs. Clements lands a leg kick, then an elbow, then an uppercut. They clinch, and separate. Nice right by Clements. Riddle lands a knee, and has Clements in a clinch. Riddle lands a nasty body kick, Josh Rosenthal steps in to stop the action, thinking it was a nut shot, that was a screw up. Tough break. Riddle scores another takedown. Clements is up, and Riddle is working for another takedown, takes Clements’ back instead. He lets Clements up. Riddle has a knack for not sticking with his grappling. The round closes, and it should belong to Riddle.


Round 2:
Leg kick by Clements to start things off. Nice punch/kick combo by Clements. Riddle working a takedown against the cage. He gets it, but Clements is trying to wall walk. Riddle plants him again. He’s got a hook in. Losses it. Now he has Clements’ back with both hooks in, turns that into a body lock, and he’s pounding him. Still pounding him, just waiting for an opening. Clements lands a huge back elbow, but Riddle is still on his back working for a choke. He spins to side control. Another decent elbow by Clements. And another. Clements is up. Riddle lands a jab, Clements answers with a body kick. Clements sprawls to stuff a takedown, and now he’s on top, delivering some hurt. Riddle responding with elbows from the bottom to close it out. Riddle controlled most of it, probably took that one too.

Round 3: They bro hug it out to start the final frame. Front kick by Clements. Huge body shot by Clements, then a knee. He has Riddle up against the cage. They separate. Riddle throws a head kick that skims Clements’ head, he appears unfazed. Riddle scores another takedown. Riddle went for a choke, and Clements is up. Riddle has an arm triangle standing, takes him down, keeps the hold, and taps him out with it! That was sweet.

Matt Riddle wins by arm triangle at 2:02 of the third round.

Next up we have Brian Ebersole vs James Head

Is it me or does James Head require a good nickname? His name just begs for one. Please feel free to sound off with your suggestions in the comments section. I’ll go first, “Sloppy.”

Ebersole is rocking the arrow, only it’s not as bushy as last time.

Round 1: Ebersole shoots immediately, Head sprawls. He shoots again, Head easily defends. They trade blows. Ebersole lands a kick to the body. Head attacks with a right followed by a knee, Ebersole with another kick. They trade jabs. Head shrugs off a half hearted takedown attempt. Head is unloading against the cage. Ebersole escapes. Head checks a leg kick. Nice combo by Ebersole. Oof, nice right to the mug by Ebersole. He shoots again and gets stuffed. Ebersole is sticking with the takedown, and he gets it, Head has him in a guillotine, but that shit aint happening on Ebersole. He has Head against the cage, trying to keep him down. Head uses the cage to push off, but he escapes. Ebersole with a cartwheel kick, and not surprisingly, Head ends up on top to end the round.


Round 2:
Ebersole again shoots immediately, Head sprawls. Ebersole charges forward with a straight left, whiffs Head. Head with a knee that barely skims Ebersole’s arrow. Straight left by Ebersole, and they clinch. Lands another straight left, then a body kick, mostly blocked. Ebersole has double under hooks, but still can’t get the takedown. Head gets his arms back, and they separate. Head lands a couple good head shots. Ebersole responds with a jab, then sloppily shoots again. Stuffed. He lands a straight to the body, then an uppercut to Head. Head going for a head clinch, not happening. Head scores on a hook. Head with a strong knee to the head, and Ebersole gets a takedown off it. Ebersole not really doing much ground and pound, and he gets swept by Head. Nice. Head is on top, but the round closes before he has a chance to mount any offense.

Round 3: Again with the weak takedown attempt. Body kick blocked by Head. Another takedown attempt, Head has a front choke, but Ebersole is impervious to that shit. Another very weak takedown try. Head with a hook followed by a knee. Good right by Ebersole. Head has Ebersole’s back, gets the takedown, but Ebersole was able to escape. Body kicks blocked by Head. Another shot defended by Head. Ebersole looks like someone gave him a Valium.  Knee to the body by Head. Ugly fight, and the fans are expressing their displeasure. Another agonizing shot by Ebersole. Defended by Head. Head charges forward with a couple decent shots to the grill. The fans are booing all the half-ass takedown attempts. Ebersole on top, but the round ends. Rough fight to watch, and to score.

The decision is in, and it’s 29-28 Head, 29-28, Ebersole, and 29-28 Head with the split decision.

The big guys are next, Cheick Kongo and Shawn Jordan.

There’s only one certainty tonight, and that is that Kongo will do a double chest thump continuously from the time he begins his walk out to the first time he knees Jordan in the sack.

Jordan may not look it, but this cat is an athlete. He can run the 40 in 4.6 seconds, stick the landing on a back flip, and fold his eyelids back.  I have a searing, lifelong jealousy of people who can do that nasty-ass eyelid thing.

And of course, Kongo is not doing the chest thump thing. I fail.

Round 1: They touch and it’s on. Kongo with a huge leg kick. Jordan pushes Kongo into the cage, going for a takedown. Kongo defending well, but Jordan is relentless with it. Kongo is out of danger, but he still has his back to the cage. Jordan going for it again. Kongo with a nice, wide base defending. Jordan with a punch to the ear. Kongo reverses and has Jordan’s back standing. He’s delivering a couple shots to the side of the head. And the karma gods step in as Kongo takes an elbow to the pills. Kongo is pretty miserable right about now, on his knees recovering.And they’re ready to resume. Kongo with a high kick, blocked. Jordan with a wild side kick, misses by a mile. Leg kick by Kongo. Kongo charges in with jabs, and has Jordan up against the cage. Kongo is looking for a takedown of his own, Jordan defending with an underhook. He reverses and has Kongo against the cage now, going for another double leg, switches to a single leg, then a high crotch, unsuccessful. Kongo with a knee as the round ends.

Round 2: Kongo opens with a knee to the body. Jordan has him against the cage again. Kongo reverses, and delivers a couple knees to the body. Jordan reverses and looking for another leg. Kongo has an underhook, defends. Another knee by Kongo, and a counter shot by Jordan. They’re in the clinch again, trade knees. They separate. Kongo with a nice straight right, and Jordan pushes him into the cage again. Kongo going for a takedown, stuffed. Now Jordan going for another leg, it just aint happening. Kongo takes his back standing, and punches to the temple. Kongo with a neck crank, going nowhere with that. Jordan is down and Kongo is on his back, but Jordan reverses and ends up on top in half guard. Who woulda thought this would turn into a grappling match? Jordan controlling, but doesn’t land much in the way of ground and pound.

Round 3: A lot of fists a flying to open up, but nothing landing, and they clinch again. Kongo is pressing Jordan up against the cage looking for a takedown. Jordan lands an elbow, Kongo responds with a knee. Kongo misses a jab, then lands a right. Jordan going for a double, switches to a single, that just isn’t there. Kongo with a knee to the body. Jordan throws sloppy shots, Kongo locks up with him again. Jordan with an uppercut that skims Kongo’s face. This is a brutal clinch war. Kongo looking for a neck, but Jordan doesn’t have one. Good knee to the body by Kongo. Jordan going for old faithful, that takedown that hasn’t worked yet. Knee to the head by Kongo. Jordan misses an uppercut. The round closes with the fans voicing their displeasure.

The judges score it 30-28, 30-27, and 30-27 for Cheick Kongo.

Hector Lombard vs Tim Boetsch is up next.

Hector Lombard has been inspiring passionate debate in MMA circles for a few years now. His supporters claim his ridiculous record of 31-2-1-1 proves he’s top of the food chain. His detractors claim his win column is populated by guys who eat baked beans out of a can and travel by rail free of charge. Tonight we find out.

All the pressure here is on Lombard. He comes in with a big rep. If he wins, well, no biggy, he was supposed to win. If he loses, he’s the overrated can crusher we’ve been mocking all these years. That’s a heavy load to bear. See Jorge Santiago for reference.

There has been a lot of controversy surrounding Lombard’s UFC debut because Dana White said it’s possible he could get a title shot if he’s victorious. This pissed off middleweights Michael Bisping and Mark Munoz something fierce. Of course, both those guys lost their last fights, Munoz badly – very fucking badly – so their opinions really don’t count for much. But, they do make a somewhat valid point. How can a guy come in after beating up fighters with no Wikipedia pages and get a title shot after just one win? It’s unfair dammit, and that’s not what America is about.

Boetsch reminds me of the father I never had, which is bizarre considering I’m five years older than him. I don’t know what it is, he just reminds me of a guy in his 50’s who builds decks for a living and slugs Coors (not that light shit either) from a can. And he’s about to face a guy who is just a tsunami of hurt and angst. I don’t know if I can watch this. I actually fear for Tim’s safety here.

Lombard and his team come out with black bandanas covering their faces like old school bank robbers. That must have some significance, but damned if I know what it is.

Round 1: Boetsch with a leg kick to start things off, then a push kick. Lombard shrugs off a takedown attempt very easily, then lands an uppercut. Lombard with a takedown of his own, and working to pull Boetsch off the cage. He wall walks, and is up. Another leg kick by Boetsch. Lombard is stationary, just coiled up waiting to explode. Tim is mobile, throwing lots of kicks. Push kick to the knee lands. Lombard with an overhand left, misses. Boetsch misses a hook and Lombard lands a short shot. They trade bombs. Lombard whizzes a right hook, barely connects. Good leg kick by Boetsch, goes for a takedown, Lombard stuffs it. Lombard goes high with a kick, blocked. The round closes without much happening. Boetsch probably took it on activity alone.

Round 2: Front kick to the body by Boetsch, Lombard lands a big left. Lombard lands a right then a left, and a low kick of his own. Boetsch tries a Superman punch, misses. Lombard responds with bombs, but does not connect. Boetsch with a side kick to the leg. Leg kick by Boetsch. Lombard lands a decent left, then a leg kick. Boetsch responds in kind. High kick by Boetsch misses, as does Lombard’s. Lombard lands a right hook. Uppercut by Lombard, whizzes the cheek. Low kick by Boetsch, Lombard lands a kick to the body that hurts Boetsch. Now Lombard is on his back, landing short shots to the temple. Tim is back up, Lombard with a takedown attempt, doesn’t score. They’re up against the cage, not doing much. Boetsch goes for a trip, didn’t work.

Round 3: Boetsch starts things off with a hard leg kick. Lombard responds with a shot to the head. Inside leg kick by Boetsch. Huge overhand left misses by Lombard. Lombard stalking, but not throwing anything. Boetsch goes in and eats a left. Another inside leg kick by Boetsch. Lombard shrugs Boetsch off effortlessly, but does not counter. Lombard skims a body kick. Lombard with a trip, but they both get up immediately. The crowd is booing viciously. Boetsch with a jab, pushes Lombard to the cage. Lombard reverses, and goes for a takedown, gets it. Boetsch up, lands a knee, but he’s up against the cage again. The round ends with lots of booing and a general sense of disappointment.

Damn the fans are letting them have it.

It’s 29-28 across the board, split decision goes to Tim Boetsch.

Interestingly, they skip the interviews. Not sure if it’s because of time constraints, or just to spare their hyped up acquisition the awkwardness of the boos.

But whatever, it’s main event time, Urijah Faber vs Renan Barao, baby!

You just gotta love Faber. The whole California surfer-dude thing, it’s not like after all these years it’s played out or anything. “The California Kid” rolls out to “California Love” with his California good looks and you just know your girlfriend who is sitting right next to you wishes she could make passionate love to his splendid ass-chin. Add that to the fact that he’s probably pretty wealthy, and will beat your punk ass down with minimal effort, and yeah, I hate him too. My pathetic jealousies aside, Faber is a bad dude. He’s been doing his thing in MMA for almost a decade and he’s still Top 2 in his division.

So can Renan Barao steal Faber’s soul? He seems like he’s got all the tools. Barao is a classic Nova Uniao fighter – a nasty ass Muay Thai striker who just happens to hold a BJJ black belt, ya know as like a secondary weapon of doom. He’s riding a 29 fight unbeaten streak – referred to as “unbeaten” rather than a “winning” streak because there’s a no-contest sandwiched in there. But petty technicalities aside, the guy is riding the longest non-losing streak I know of. The only problem is that until he got to the WEC in 2010 only one of his opponents had a Wikipedia page, and we all know that’s the true benchmark of a successful fighter. Plus he’s just kinda scary. I wouldn’t be surprised if he had some Gunny Hartman powers of coercion to make a fool choke himself.

Round 1: Barao misses a high kick. And another. Faber charges forward, gets pushed back with a few shots. Front kick by Faber, answered by Barao. Uppercut by Faber. Hook by Barao misses, as does a high kick. Faber answers with a high kick, misses as well. Barao misses a wheel kick. Faber lands an inside leg kick, Barao answers back with one of his own, then hits on a spinning back kick. Then lands a nice knee to the body on Faber. High kick misses by Barao, eats a jab from Faber. Inside leg kick by Barao. Body punch by Faber, then he eats a head shot. They trade jabs. Hard leg kick landed by Barao. Good right by Faber to end the round.

Round 2: Barao lands a leg kick, misses a head kick. Faber is doing a great job of not getting his leg demolished. Faber lands a good right, checks a kick. Barao gets poked in the eye, the action is halted. Here we go. Flying knee by Barao misses, and Faber has him against the cage. Faber lands a right. Good leg kick from Faber. Barao with a big leg kick. Nice body shot by Barao. Faber charges forward and misses everything. Another leg kick by Barao. They trade rights. Spinning kick by Barao misses. They trade hooks to the head. Barao with a stiff jab, followed by a leg kick. Barao lands another right, and a brutal leg kick.

Round 3: Overhand right lands by Faber. Big kick/punch combo from Barao, misses a flying knee. Faber goes for a takedown, stuffed. Barao eats a right. Front kick by Faber, eats a left for it. Good straight right by Faber. Huge straight left by Barao, stumbles Faber back. Barao lands a big leg kick. And another. A wild exchange, not much landed by either fighter. Godo uppercut to the body by Faber. Nice right by Barao. Faber with a combo, Barao covers up. Barao lands a nice kick to the leg. And another. Good jab by Faber, but he eats another leg kick. Faber slips a jab, then eats one.

Round 4: Good jab by Faber. Nice overhand left landed by Barao. Faber jumps in, lands to the head. Huge leg kick by Barao. Body punch by Faber. Spinning kick misses by Barao. Faber grazes him with a left. Faber takes a finger to the eye, but he appears fine. Barao lands a left hook. Faber with a jab. Faber lands a low kick of his own. Faber goes for a takedown, Barao stuffs it easily. Barao with a combination, then a leg kick. Good straight right by Barao, followed by a hook to the body. Faber shoots, gets pushed back. They trade shots. The round ends, and Faber is down. He has to get down and dirty, wedgies, wet willies, whatever it takes man.

Round 5: They hut it out, and the final round begins. Barao lands a straight left. Faber misses a kick. Body jab from Faber, then he eats a shot to the mug. Barao with a left hook, then a jab. Faber connects with a left. Then lands a shot to the body. Faber catches a leg, but can’t do anything with it. They trade jabs. Faber pushes forward, there’s nothing there for him. Barao catches Faber’s leg and blasts him. Big left hook from Barao. Superman punch lands from Faber. Massive leg kick from Barao. Then a stiff left jab. Barao lands a big right. Barao misses another spinning kick, and that’s that.

Barring a fluke, Barao got this.

The decision is in, 49-46, 50-45, 49-46 and Renan Barao wins the unanimous decision.

There it is, folks. Renan Barao is the UFC Interim Bantamweight Champion, for whatever that’s worth.

That’s it for me, y’all, thanks for chilling. It’s time to pop a Coors and just be glad that Boetsch is still alive.

UFC on FUEL: Munoz vs. Weidman Aftermath — Baby, You’re a Star

(A replay of Weidman’s incredible standing elbow and the savage ground-and-pound finish, via fueltv.)

With so many contenders clogging up the upper echelon of the UFC middleweight division — all with their hands out for a title shotChris Weidman had to do something extra special to get noticed in his fight against Mark Munoz last night. Because let’s face it: Until now, his name wasn’t setting off alarm bells with many casual fans. Sure, the Serra-Longo-bred wrestler/grappler was 4-0 in the UFC, but his personality wasn’t “colorful” enough to create hype around his fights (à la master salesmen Sonnen, Bisping, Mayhem), and if your most impressive performance in the Octagon is a submission win over Tom Lawlor, you still have a long way to go, right?

So this is how you make your name in the UFC. Step 1) Utterly dominate an opponent who was himself thought to be one of the next challengers to the middleweight title. Step 2) Finish the fight in a way that immediately clinches a spot on future “Best Knockouts of 2012” lists, both for its technical brilliance (the Spider-esque timing of that standing elbow!) and for its hard-to-watch brutality (uh, you gonna stop this one any time soon, Josh?). Step 3) Call out Anderson Silva after the fight — hell, go ahead and say you can submit him — just four days after Silva re-cemented himself as the most untouchable 185’er in MMA history.

And so, a main event that was not officially a #1 contender’s match might turn out to be one after all. Sure, there are bigger names than Weidman in the title hunt — and maybe he’ll have to fight somebody like Alan Belcher or the Lombard/Boetsch winner before he gets the opportunity — but no matter what the future holds for him, Chris Weidman is a star now. In one fight, he went from being a semi-anonymous contender to the name on every UFC fan’s lips.

Meanwhile, Mark Munoz drops down the ladder where hungry middleweight up-and-comers like Constantinos Philippou and Francis Carmont are on their own heat-seeking paths to contendership. In other words, the UFC middleweight division has never been deeper and more exciting — which makes it the worst possible time to take a high-profile loss, especially one in which you weren’t competitive for a single moment of the fight. We haven’t seen the last of the Filipino Wrecking Machine by any means, but it’s going to take him a long time to claw his way back to where he was before Wednesday night.

In other news…


(A replay of Weidman’s incredible standing elbow and the savage ground-and-pound finish, via fueltv.)

With so many contenders clogging up the upper echelon of the UFC middleweight division — all with their hands out for a title shotChris Weidman had to do something extra special to get noticed in his fight against Mark Munoz last night. Because let’s face it: Until now, his name wasn’t setting off alarm bells with many casual fans. Sure, the Serra-Longo-bred wrestler/grappler was 4-0 in the UFC, but his personality wasn’t “colorful” enough to create hype around his fights (à la master salesmen Sonnen, Bisping, Mayhem), and if your most impressive performance in the Octagon is a submission win over Tom Lawlor, you still have a long way to go, right?

So this is how you make your name in the UFC. Step 1) Utterly dominate an opponent who was himself thought to be one of the next challengers to the middleweight title. Step 2) Finish the fight in a way that immediately clinches a spot on future “Best Knockouts of 2012″ lists, both for its technical brilliance (the Spider-esque timing of that standing elbow!) and for its hard-to-watch brutality (uh, you gonna stop this one any time soon, Josh?). Step 3) Call out Anderson Silva after the fight — hell, go ahead and say you can submit him — just four days after Silva re-cemented himself as the most untouchable 185′er in MMA history.

And so, a main event that was not officially a #1 contender’s match might turn out to be one after all. Sure, there are bigger names than Weidman in the title hunt — and maybe he’ll have to fight somebody like Alan Belcher or the Lombard/Boetsch winner before he gets the opportunity — but no matter what the future holds for him, Chris Weidman is a star now. In one fight, he went from being a semi-anonymous contender to the name on every UFC fan’s lips.

Meanwhile, Mark Munoz drops down the ladder where hungry middleweight up-and-comers like Constantinos Philippou and Francis Carmont are on their own heat-seeking paths to contendership. In other words, the UFC middleweight division has never been deeper and more exciting — which makes it the worst possible time to take a high-profile loss, especially one in which you weren’t competitive for a single moment of the fight. We haven’t seen the last of the Filipino Wrecking Machine by any means, but it’s going to take him a long time to claw his way back to where he was before Wednesday night.

In other news…

Weidman’s victory earned him a $40,000 Knockout of the Night bonus. The Fight of the Night awards went to light-heavyweights James Te-Huna and Joey Beltran for their three-round punch-out that Te-Huna won by unanimous decision, which is particularly impressive when you consider that Te-Huna broke a hand and a foot in the first round. Submission of the Night went to Alex Caceres, who triangle-choked Damacio Page in the prelims, and continues to prove that he’s more than just the “Bruce Leroy” caricature he presented on TUF 12. That’s the third-straight submission loss in the UFC (and fourth overall) for Page, who’s probably going bye-bye.

Speaking of the prelims, anybody see that head-kick that Andrew Craig landed on Rafael Natal? Natal was lighting Craig up in the second round, but then allowed him to recover on the mat. Then, Craig got to his feet and this happened (via IronForgesIron):

Nasty. Here are the complete results from UFC on FUEL TV 4: Munoz vs. Weidman…

MAIN CARD
– Chris Weidman def. Mark Muñoz via KO, 1:37 of round 2
– James Te-Huna def. Joey Beltran via unanimous decision (30-26, 30-27 x 2)
– Aaron Simpson def. Kenny Robertson via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 29-28)
– Francis Carmont def. Karlos Vemola via submission (rear-naked choke), 1:39 of round 2
– T.J. Dillashaw def. Vaughan Lee via submission (rear-naked choke), 2:33 of round 1
– Rafael dos Anjos def. Anthony Njokuani via unanimous decision (30-27 x 2, 29-28)

PRELIMINARY CARD
– Alex Caceres def. Damacio Page via submission (triangle choke), 1:27 of round 2
– Chris Cariaso def. Josh Ferguson via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
– Andrew Craig def. Rafael Natal via KO, 4:52 of round 2
– Marcelo Guimaraes def. Dan Stittgen via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)
– Raphael Assunção def. Issei Tamura via TKO, 0:25 of round 2


(Sorry, guys. I just had to. Props: JessicaKardashian1)

UFC 148: Silva vs. Sonnen 2 — Live Results & Commentary


(Right before this picture was taken, Chael asked Anderson to smell his finger. And yes, it smelled like steak sauce. / Photo courtesy of CombatLifestyle.com. For more from this set, click here.)

UFC 148 goes down this evening at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, and the stakes have never been higher — either Anderson Silva‘s historic middleweight title reign comes to an abrupt end, or all of Chael Sonnen’s limbs and teeth are about to be broken. Either way, we’re in for an interesting night.

Also on the card: Tito Ortiz bids us farewell with a rubber-match against his old buddy Forrest Griffin, Demian Maia makes his welterweight debut against Dong Hyun Kim, and Cung Le tries to rebound against the returning Patrick Cote.

Live round-by-round results from the “Silva vs. Sonnen 2” pay-per-view main card will be piling up after the jump beginning at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT, courtesy of Elias Cepeda. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and please toss in your own two cents in the comments section.


(Right before this picture was taken, Chael asked Anderson to smell his finger. And yes, it smelled like steak sauce. / Photo courtesy of CombatLifestyle.com. For more from this set, click here.)

UFC 148 goes down this evening at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, and the stakes have never been higher — either Anderson Silva‘s historic middleweight title reign comes to an abrupt end, or all of Chael Sonnen’s limbs and teeth are about to be broken. Either way, we’re in for an interesting night.

Also on the card: Tito Ortiz bids us farewell with a rubber-match against his old buddy Forrest Griffin, Demian Maia makes his welterweight debut against Dong Hyun Kim, and Cung Le tries to rebound against the returning Patrick Cote.

Live round-by-round results from the “Silva vs. Sonnen 2″ pay-per-view main card will be piling up after the jump beginning at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT, courtesy of Elias Cepeda. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and please toss in your own two cents in the comments section.

We are live, ‘tater nation! The main card for the biggest card since for ever since is underway.

Mike Easton vs. Ivan Menvijar

Rd 1

Easton takes the center of the ring and is moving in and out, bouncing up and down while incorporating lots of head movement early. Glancing leg kick and jab from Easton. Menjivar lands a rear leg kick, swings and misses with a head kick. Menjivar misses on an over hand right. Easton throws a punch combo, misses, Ivan misses with a spinning back fist.

The, overhand right from Menjivar, countered by Easton swinging a right cross, left hook combo pattern repeats itself. Neither man has been able to connect solidly yet though. Easton lands a lead head kick that backs Menjivar up. Ivan appears to still have his legs under him, though, and continues his movement.

Ivan returns fire with a read head kick but Easton blocks it. Easton attempts but misses on a spinning back kick. Easton counters a punch from Menjivar with a cross. Easton starting to finish his combos with rear round house leg kicks. Menjivar using teeps to keep Easton at bay.

Ivan swings and misses with another overhand right, is countered by a right from Easton. Easton shoots for a take down with seconds left in the round but is stuffed. The horn sounds and we head into the 2nd.

 Rd 2

Easton with a switch kick with his left leg to the right side of Menjivar’s body. Lots of feints from Ivan, lots of head movement from Mike. The pair briefly get tied up in a head and arm clinch but soon separate. Easton throws a lead inside leg kick, Menjivar tries to counter but misses with another over hand right.

Easton throws another right cross, left hook combo and the left hook lands. Menjivar working straight front kicks to the knees of Easton. Nothing has landed too stiff yet though. Menjivar catches a right kick to the body from Easton and tries to kick sweep the other leg out from him but can’t move him.

Easton still taking the center of the cage most of the time, dictating the pace. Menjivar lands a right high kick. Easton looks unmoved. Easton blocks a left high kick. Under a minute left and Menjivar is moving to his left, Easton’s power side. Menjivar lands a right hook to the body.

Easton lands a body shot of his own. Easton has Menjivar backed against the cage and throws a flying knee that is blocked. Round ends. Fans boo. Plebians.

Rd 3

Joe Rogan comments that Easton is probably up on the scorecards based on his aggression and a slight edge in shots landed. If I had to guess, I’d say he’s probably right.

Easton is speeding it up, throwing more punch combos. They are not landing, but he’s swinging hard. Menjivar has yet to mount much of an offense yet this round either, but is pawing and measuring with the jab and looking to counter with punches. Menjivar throws a spinning back forearm but is blocked. Easton throws a left high kick that is blocked.

Menjivar throws a spinning side kick but misses as Easton changes levels and takes him down. Two and a half minutes left in the round and Easton has Ivan pinned against the cage in his full guard. Menjivar throws up an arm bar attempt but Easton quickly gets out.

Easton postures up from inside the full guard, Menjivar scrambles to his feet. Menjivar complains about something and referee Josh Rosenthal steps in momentarily but restarts the action with barely a moment’s delay.

A minute left and Menjivar  lands a right hand to Easton’s body. Easton fires back but misses. Easton tries a jumping switch kick or something and misses and falls to the ground. He gets right back up and tries a spinning kick.

The round ends and the fans boo again. Both fighters embrace, Easton raises his hands in victory. What do the judges think?

Two judges have it 30-27 for Easton and the third scores it 29-28. Mike Easton gets it done. Who cares if Antonio Esfandiari and his fellow hooligan Vegas crowd members liked it or not?

Chad Mendes vs. Cody McKenzie

McKenzie has such a nasty guillotine, who cares if he pretends he invented it? He’s stepping up in level of competition for sure against Mendes. No matter how it goes down, you gotta hand it to the Alaska native McKenzie for truly looking like he’s from Alaska.

 Rd 1

McKenzie throws a few missed head kicks and then tries one to the body which Mendes catches and then lands a monster right punch to the body that drops his opponent to the mat, face-first. McKenzie has the wind knocked out of him, is turtled up and Mendes ends the fight with hammer fist strikes. Referee stoppage at thirty one seconds, Chad Mendes with the win.

Don Hyun Kim vs. Demian Maia

Rd 1 

Kim throws a lead low kick and Maia shoots right in. He’s clinched up against the fence and quickly works to the back of Kim, first getting one hook in and then letting go and trying to suplex Kim. Maia keeps control of Kim as he moves him around the ring, trying to slam him backwards and then forward.

Maia gets the trip, slamming Kim’s head right on the edge of the cage. Maia gets mount and starts to rain down punches. Its clear that Kim is in pain and Maia stands up, raising his hands in victory. No protest from Kim, he’s done.

Maia beats Mendes for quickest stoppage of the night thus far with a TKO in 27 seconds. Wow. I guess 170 might be a good weight for Maia if he can rag doll someone like Kim.

Whoah, on second (or 10th) instant replay viewing, it looks like Kim jacked his arm up by posting on it as he was being taken down, ala Shogun vs. Coleman I.

Patrick Cote vs. Cung Le

Cote walks out to Hammer’s “Too legit to  2 (?)quit.” And he looks to be singing along the shit out of it, too. If Cung Le comes out to something from Vanilla Ice, I’m getting up and walking away…He does not. LiveBlog continues.

Rd 1

Cote paws a jab, throws a body kick, Cung catches it and kicks out Cote’s other leg out from under him. Cote sorta blocks a head kick. Cote seems eager to strike with Le. Cote pushing the pace, Le, countering with marching-forward punches. No one has landed big yet with strikes.

Le continues to work the right side of Cote with his own rear left leg, lands a body kick. Le lands a jab to the head. Le lands a body kick, Cote answers with his own. Cote lands a hook, Le throws a body kick that’s blocked. Cote lands another hook.

Cote storms Le, clips him with an uppercut, Le side steps and hits the back of Cote’s head with an over hand right. Cote has made no attempt at a take down yet. Le clips Cote with a left punch. Le throws a body kick, gets mostly blocked. Le with a lead side kick to the thigh of Cote.

Cote switches to a south paw stance for a moment, then switches back. Cote stalks Le around the cage for the closing moments. The horn sounds and we head to round number two.

Rd 2

Cote takes the center of the ring but Le eagerly meets him. Cote gets a clinch, Le separates them with an over hand right. Le lands partially with a spinning heel kick to the head of Cote. Le throws another high kick. Cote blocks and answers with a straight right down the middle to the face of Le.

Cote lands another right hand in a punch combo to Le’s head. Le lands a stif lead right hook to the jaw of Cote that hurts him. Cote keeps moving forward, gets the Thai plum and throws a knee to the head of Le but is mostly blocked.

Le’s face is cute open. Does not seem to bother him at all yet. Cote gets his head moving, hoping to be more elusive. Le throws a left rear body kick and then a right hook. Cote lands an uppercut and pushes forward with punches that mostly miss and a kick to the hip of Le. Le looks composed but simply reacting to Cote may be taking its toll on the San Shou legend.

Le lands a right hook, then another. They are in the Thai clinch, trading shots, the round ends.

Rd 3

The two find themselves in the clinch once more. Cote is able to back Le up against the cage a minute in to the final round. Cote has both under hooks, Le swims in and lands a knee to the head of Cote as he circles away from the cage. They are in free standing range once more.

Le whiffs on two head kicks. Cote goes to the left side of Le’s body with a right hook and they are soon in a clinch again, with Le’s back pressed against the cage. Le is bleeding from under his left eye. Le lands a trip slam! Sanshou ain’t only good for crazy kicks, people. Cote gets back to his feet and tries for a single leg take down. Le defends and frees himself.

Le lands a counter right hook flush to Cote’s jaw. Cote fires back, more slowly, with punches to the head. They end up in a loose clinch and Cote fires shots, Le weaves under and lands a thudding over hand right to Cote’s head. Le lands another takedown. This time he holds Cote down for longer and he’s in the Canadian’s full guard with thirty seconds left. Le smothers Cote, Cote tries to create space by opening his guard and pushing on Le’s hip with his own left leg. The horn sounds and the fight ends.

Will Le get his first ever UFC win or will Cote have a successful return to the organization? Only Nevada’s finest know right now…

Le wins the unanimous decision! This guy deserves a lot of credit for venturing outside of his safe kickboxing and Sanshou world where he was famous and dominant into MMA. He now has a win in the best MMA organization in the world and no one will ever be able to take that away for him. Has to be the highest moment of his martial arts career.

Tito Ortiz vs. Forrest Griffin III

Tito says this will be his final walk out to the Octagon. He’s fought more times in the UFC than anyone else and, win or lose, young or old, healthy or hurt, has never embarrassed himself in the cage. How good will Tito look against Griffin, another former champion and future hall of famer that may soon also be on the way out?

Tito is walking out first. Muy interesante. Damn it, Tito. Why did you have to ruin an introduction that I’m trying to make respectful and somber by wearing a toy medieval war helmet that, under a certain light, looks like a sado masochist mask? Oh well, Tito is amped-looking as always, as he sings along to Eminem playing over the arena’s loudspeakers.

Forrest looks calm, relaxed but focused as he walks to the ring in his awesome Hayabusa chimp shirt. Let’s get it on (like that one? Just a little phrase I came up with tonight).

Rd 1

Griffin bounces around, Tight stays tight with his guard. Tito lands an over hand right to Forrest’s head. Forrest throwing a lot of kicks for someone fighting a great wrestler. Tito gets a knee-pick and takes Forrest down almost a minute into the round. He has Griffin against the cage, Griffin tries to angle away. Griffin gets to one elbow and then hand against the cage, trying to stand up. Tito keeps the pressure on and Forrest cannot get up. He’s in a half, then butterfly guard.

Griffin gets up and they are back in free-standing range. Forrest throwing the jab and hooks, missing. Forrest then lands a right hand to the head. Forrest throws a left body kick that gets blocked. Tito goes for another knee-pick, doesn’t get it, throws a right head kick that is blocked. Forrest lands a rear leg kick and then two quick stiff punches on Tito’s head. Tito is stunned and then shoots from far away with no set-up. Forrest stuffs the shot.

Griffin looking more comfortable, he clips Tito with a left hook. Tito is hurt. Griffin throws him against the cage, Tito stumbles and turns back around to square up. But Tito is moving slowly now and getting tagged by Forrest.

Under a minute left, Tito lands a jab, then another, to the face of Griffin. Griffin lands a glancing super man punch. Forrest lands an inside leg kick and then a knee to the body. Tito shoots in at Forrest’s waist, takes his back and then switches to an ankle pick from the front, dragging Forrest down to the mat, but not cleanly. The horn sounds.

Rd 2

Tito starts the round by landing a right cross to Forrest’s head. Tito lands another one, it hurts Forrest. Tito lands a left hook. Forrest is hanging tough, gets the clinch and backs Tito against the cage, working a right under hook and controlling Tito’s right hand by holding the wrist with his left. Tito changes levels for a shot, gets stuffed but gets his back off of the fence. They are back standing in the center of the ring.

Forrest lands a rear leg kick. Forrest is more active with punches but Tito attempts to counter punch hard. Tito with a jab to the face, then a right cross that finds Forrest’s chin. Forrest lands his own punch to Tito’s dome. Forrest with a right hand down the middle through Tito’s guard and then another leg kick that Tito checks. Forrest connects with a jab. Then fires and lands with a quick cross. Forrest ducks under a Tito hook and hits Tito again.

Griffin lands another cross. Tito pumps and lands a double jab to the head. Tito is bleeding a little bit on the left side of his face. Forrest lands a right punch and pushes Tito away with his forearms. Tito is flat-footed. Forrest lands another right hand. Tito fires back but mostly misses.

Tito walks into another jab. One minute left. Forrest lands a a right hand to Tito’s jaw. Forrest glances Tito’s face with a front kick to the face. Forrest misses on a big uppercut. Tito shoots for a double leg with ten seconds left. At first it appears like he may have but Forrest defends, turns a corner and the round ends with Forrest landing hammer-fists to the side of Tito’s head as Tito hangs on to a leg of Forrest while on his own knees.

Rd 3

Possibly the last round of Tito Ortiz‘ career. Forrest opens with a rear leg kick. Forrest is fresher, bouncing around, Tito is still flat-footed. Forrest changes levels and then lands a right uppercut to the head. Forrest throwing quick punch combos now and finds his mark. Tito digs in and lands a big left hook, though, that drops Forrest!

Forrest tumbles backwards and does a backwards somersault. He gets back to his feet. Tito hits another knee-pick take down. He’s inside of Forrest’s gull guard now. Forrest tries to get back up but cannot. Forrest gets his left foot on Tito’s hip, pushing him away and up into the air but Tito regains his pressure and forces Forrest back onto his back. Full guard again. Tito posturing down, Forrest tries to lock up a key-lock. tito defends.

Tito not able to connect with strikes yet, having his hands full keeping control of Forrest. Forrest backs up to the cage and stands up. They are clinched up with two minutes left. Forrest does not slow down at all and presses Tito against the cage. Forrest lands a knee to Tito’s body.

Ortiz is gassed and hurt, standing with his back to and near the cage. Forrest connects with three more left hands, then a clipping right cross. One minute left. Tito lands a looping right hand to the face of Forrest. Forrest is fresher but might be down on the score cards.

Thirty seconds left. Tito standing in front of Forrest. Tito lands a jab. Tito changes levels, thinks about a shot, doesn’t go for it. Ten seconds left,the two swing as wildly as they can, Tito lands a shot, Forrest lands a knee.

Decision time!

No, wait, Forrest walks out of the Octagon and steals Tito’s special moment!

Is Griffin frustrated? Does he feel he lost the fight? Tito is unsure what is happening but is obviously excited by the turn of events in some way and yells out. He’s in the cage and Forrest isn’t.

No, wait, Griffin has come back into the ring. Ok, decision time now…for reals, we think.

The stats show Griffin having landed nearly three times as many strikes, but Tito landed knockdowns and take downs at key points.

Not enough – Forrest Griffin gets the 29-28 unanimous decision. He shrugs his shoulders. The two fighters embrace.

“Tito Ortiz, that was an awesome performance. Was that really your last performance in the Octagon?” Forrest has taken the microphone and is conducting the interview! Ortiz he is done and thanks everyone for their support.

Rogan gets the mic back and interviews Griffin. “I feel like we’ve got three draws,” Forrest says. In a class move, both fighters trade t-shirts.

Chael Sonnen vs. Anderson Silva

 

As an aside, let’s reflect on just how far our sport has come – that’s a lot of swoosh symbols and burger king logos.

Rd 1

Sonnen with the quick take down! Silva on his back, using full guard in the center of the cage. Sonnen pushing Silva closer to the cage. Silva trying to control Sonnen’s posture but Sonnen is active from the guard with punches. Sonnen working to pass! Sonnen passes, then gets back into half guard.

Sonnen working punches, elbows and controlling Silva’s far side. Anderson is holding Sonnen tight, trying to control his posture, with double under hooks. Sonnen staying heavy on top of Silva in his half guard. Sonnen uses some knees to the left side of Anderson’s body. Sonnen using open palm strikes to the side of Silva’s head. Chael swings big and misses, Silva locks in an arm-triangle hold but has nothing, Chael breaks free and gets back to work with short punches while Silva hugs down on his head and body.

The ref annoyingly calls for them to “work.” They are. Chael works to pass Silva’s half guard and then returns to punching. Chael into full mount with under a minute left!

Chael throwing short elbows and is now getting in his own shoulder strikes. Pay back is a son of a gun. Anderson has his hands up, under Chael’s arms, trying to control Chael’s posture. He does succeed at not letting Chael do any big damage to him while mounted. Round ends.

Silva stands in his corner during the break. Seconds out, time in.

Rd 2

Chael comes right back at Silva, manages not to get caught with any strikes, and clinches up with the champ. Silva is being pressed against the cage. Chael has an over-under body lock. Chael momentarily changes levels for a take down but Silva defends.

They separate, Silva lands a big punch to Chael. Chael lands a straight cross.

Chael tries for a spinning back fist and Silva, hands down, slips and circles away. Sonnen falls hard from the force of his own missed blow! Silva is late to follow up but does, with strikes and a knee that would have struck Chael’s head if he had not blocked it. Chael gets up but soon falls back down against the cage. Silva follows up with strikes on the ground and that’s the fight.

Sonnen once again took it to Silva but paid the price earlier than before, losing for a second time. Anderson Silva is still the UFC middleweight champion.

Pedro Rizzo and Silva’s stylishly dressed kids are in the ring to celebrate Anderson’s win as he is announced as the victor. Anderson walks over to Chael, brings him to the center of the ring, tells everyone to cheer him and then invites him to a party at his house.

Chael calls Anderson a “true champion,” in his interview with Rogan. Will uber promoter trash talking public Chael return soon or will respectful and honest public Chael stick around for awhile? Only time will tell.

That’s it for now, folks. Thanks for partying with us.

UFC 147: Silva vs. Franklin II — Live Results and Commentary


(“You look very familiar, bro. Verrrrry familiar.” / Image via buzzbox.com)

The UFC makes its first stop in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, tonight for an extraordinarily cursed card that, let’s face it, we probably wouldn’t be watching if it wasn’t our job. Wanderlei Silva is fighting Rich Franklin again, this time at a 190-pound catchweight. (Also known as “middleweight plus.”) Fabricio Werdum is battling fellow big-man Mike Russow. And some guys from TUF Brazil are fighting too, although not all of the ones who should be. It is what it is. I’m guessing that very few of you will be buying this card, but if you’re out doing something more interesting tonight, please use your smart phones to follow along when you can.

Handling the thankless liveblog duties for this evening is Anthony Gannon, who will be layin’ down round-by-round updates from the UFC 147 pay-per-view main card after the jump, beginning at 10 p.m. ET. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest. And to prevent this from becoming the least-commented CagePotato liveblog of all time, I encourage you to use the comments section to discuss anything that comes to mind. Seriously, it doesn’t have to be UFC related. I’ll give you a topic to start off with: Germany invaded Poland earlier today. Do you think America should get involved?


(“You look very familiar, bro. Verrrrry familiar.” / Image via buzzbox.com)

The UFC makes its first stop in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, tonight for an extraordinarily cursed card that, let’s face it, we probably wouldn’t be watching if it wasn’t our job. Wanderlei Silva is fighting Rich Franklin again, this time at a 190-pound catchweight. (Also known as “middleweight plus.”) Fabricio Werdum is battling fellow big-man Mike Russow. And some guys from TUF Brazil are fighting too, although not all of the ones who should be. It is what it is. I’m guessing that very few of you will be buying this card, but if you’re out doing something more interesting tonight, please use your smart phones to follow along when you can.

Handling the thankless liveblog duties for this evening is Anthony Gannon, who will be layin’ down round-by-round updates from the UFC 147 pay-per-view main card after the jump, beginning at 10 p.m. ET. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest. And to prevent this from becoming the least-commented CagePotato liveblog of all time, I encourage you to use the comments section to discuss anything that comes to mind. Seriously, it doesn’t have to be UFC related. I’ll give you a topic to start off with: Germany invaded Poland earlier today. Do you think America should get involved?

Please stand by…

UFC 146, son! Bring on the wings, Natty Ice, and some of dem ho’s, cause I’m fittin’ to lose my mind. Up in here. Up in here. Oh wait, UFC 146 was last month. This is UFC 147, ya know, the one that should be free on the FUEL channel no one gets, right after All-Star Bass Fishing. Yep, they only bring me out for the important shit.

I’m not going to go so far as to say that UFC 147 is a suck-ass card, per se, but it’s certainly not worthy of $50. Hell, that Grant can be used to buy so many other things: a night of serious drinking at the local bar (happy hour of course), an intimate dinner for two at Denny’s, or, if you’re fortunate enough to find a massage joint randy enough to specialize in over 50 masseuses, a nice rub n’ tug.  Hey, don’t knock experience, bitch. That shit counts.

This card is so bad it’s rumored that the UFC didn’t even bother sending Rogan and Goldy down for it. Instead, Goldy’s role is being filled by a Magic 8 ball with uber-white bottom teeth programmed with redundant phrases like, “These guys train hard, Joe.” Rogan will be replaced with a hologram set to repeat, “Nice leg kick” every 19 seconds.

Previously scheduled to be Silva vs. Vitor Belfort, this is a much better fight for Wandy. Rich Franklin is a bad dude, but he aint a killer like Vitor. I know we all love Wandy n’ all, but let’s be honest, Vitor would give him a severe beating ala Colonel Braddock on General Yin. It wasn’t that Yin was a chump. Quite the contrary. But Braddock was just a much better fighter, plus Yin put a rat in a bag and tied it to Braddock’s head, while hanging him upside down with his hands tied behind his back. Such acts tend to have a lasting effect on people and make them a tad vengeful. Incidentally, seven years of confinement, torture, and malnutrition didn’t much affect Braddock physically as he was able to easily beat Yin to death before he bounced up outta that piece.

Anyway, if recent history is any indication, though, tonight’s fights should be kick ass. The worse a card looks on paper, the better the fights are. It’s like a cosmological joke, or something. So let’s get pumped for a phenomenal card, because hot DAMN does this one look like dog shit.

We begin with a scan of the crowd, and they look fired up. Apparently no one told the Brazilians that this is a weak card. Rogan and Goldy play up the significance of the main event. And it’s very difficult to take Rich Franklin seriously when that hair makes him look like Lloyd Christmas.

Yuri Alcantara vs. Hacran Dias

Holy shit, Buffer busts out some Portuguese.

Round 1: God Arianny is hot. Here we go. Yuri fakes a kick. He charges forward, Dias pushes him into the cage, going for a trip, eventually gets it. He peppers Yuri with a few shots. Dias looking to take Yuri’s back. Now he’s on top, looking for a head and arm triangle, but the cage is in his way. Yuri is out of trouble, but still has Dias on top of him. Dias blasts him with an elbow. Yuri is up, but Dias slams him back to the mat. He’s in Yuri’s full guard. Dias controlling Yuri, but not doing much damage. Now Dias lands a few good ones. Yuri reverses out and is on Dias’ back, kneeing him in the ass. Dias has a standing Kimura, and they break. They end the round by trading kicks.

Round 2: Flying knee by Dias, skims Yuri. Yuri misses a hook. Dias misses a leg kick. Yuri lands a body kick and clinches, tries to take Dias down but ends up on the bottom. Shitty break. Dias working the body. Lands a decent elbow. Yuri goes for an armbar, looks pretty nasty, but Dias is out. He jumps back into Yuri’s guard. Yuri looks eerily relaxed down there. Someone needs to tell him he’s losing this fight. Dias passes to half guard. Yuri is back to his feet. Dias is having none of that and takes him down again. He’s in half guard, trying to pass to mount, but Yuri is hanging tough. Dias is dropping elbows, mostly being blocked. They get stood up for lack of action. Dias with a front kick. Yuri with a nice straight left, but he’s now down two rounds to none.

Round 3: Yuri looks like someone gave him a lude. He needs to get going. He lands a shot. Then misses a combo. Yuri lands a kick. Dias to the body in return, then hits a leg kick. Yuri misses with a huge bomb. Dias kicks the body, Yuri catches it and shrugs it off. Leg kick checked by Yuri. Dias has Yuri against the cage, scores another takedown. He peppering Yuri with little shots to the head. Yuri is up, and Dias plants him yet again. He’s in Yuri’s guard, and the crowd is getting restless. They get stood up again. Now with 40 seconds left, Yuri comes alive. He’s on top, in half guard, lands some decent shots. Too little too late, more than likely. We go to the judges.

Dias wins unanimous decision, 29-28, 30-27, and 30-27.

Next up is Fabricio Werdum vs. Mike Russow

Russow roles out to ‘Simple Man.’ Sweet.

While we have a minute, walkout music needs to be addressed. It pretty much sucks ass and is getting progressively worse. Why wouldn’t a guy come out to ‘Run to the Hills’ by Iron Maiden? That song makes me want to drop indiscriminant bombs on unsuspecting villagers. Some of these songs make me want to snuggle up on the couch with a Marcel Proust novel and a cup of hot cocoa. With marshmallows. I’m just waiting for someone to come out to Air Supply. Granted, one would be hard pressed to find a lovelier tune than ‘I’m All Outta Love,’ but you’re only supposed to listen to that shit in the confines of your car with the windows securely shut, like any decent person. This issue is imperative to the future of the sport and needs to be addressed at the next fighter summit.

Round 1: Herb Dean is the ref and we’re set to go. Russow charges forward with a couple short jabs. Werdum grabs Russow and delivers a knee. They clinch, and separate. Russow with a nice hook. Werdum with a huge leg kick, then a left to the face. He lands a right too. A big uppercut drops Russow, and Werdum commences to batter Russow’s head with hammer fists. Herb kindly steps in and halts the action.

Russow is a tough guy, but this is what happens when you match a part time fighter against a Top 10 heavyweight.

Werdum takes home a TKO victory at 2:28 of the first round.

Godofredo Pepev vs. Rony Mariano is up next.

Rony is crying on his way to the cage, wearing a Jason mask to boot. Very cool contrast of emotions.

See this is what I’m talking about. Fredo rolls out to Disturbed. Nice.

These cats are scrapping to be the featherweight TUF: Brazil winner. Mike Goldberg gives us a sociology lesson on humble beginnings and what winning this would mean.

Round 1: Fredo pushes forward with a right, clinches Rony against the cage. He delivers a knee. Rony answers with a knee of his own. Fredo charges again, has Rony against the cage. Fredo actually pulls guard. He’s looking for a Kimura. Rony is free. Fredo delivers a few punches to Rony’s back. Rony is just holding on for dear life. They get stood up. Rony misses a head kick by a mile, but lands a nice leg kick. Fredo jumps in and catches a flying knee to the grill. He then pulls guard again and lands a few elbows to the dome. Fredo is pretty active down there, but he ends the round on the bottom.

Round 2: Leg kick by Fredo. Rony with a jab to the body. And another. Fredo misses a high kick, but lands a left. Another body jab by Rony. Rony misses an overhand right, and they tie up. Fredo pulls guard again. Rony finally realizes he’s allowed to strike from top position, lands an elbow. Fredo is up. Fredo charges forward wildly, and eats a coupe shots for his effort. Rony lands a nice left. Fredo with a leg kick. Rony kicks to the body, Fredo catches it and throws him off. Fredo lands a left hook, and a jab. Rony with a nice overhand right. Fredo misses a spinning back fist. Damn, Rony misses a wheel kick to end the round.

Round 3: Fredo kicks high, Rony blocks. Rony lands a huge right, rocks Fredo. They’re clinched against the cage, now they separate. Fredo misses another spinning backfist by a mile. Wild exchange by both guys. Rony lands a straight right. Fredo kicks Rony in the jimmy. Rony is nursing his jewels, and we’re all set to go again. Jab by Fredo. Big shot from Rony, misses with a flying knee. Fredo going for a takedown, decides to just pull guard again, and why not, it’s worked out so well for him thus far. Rony is kicking Fredo’s legs, refuses to jump into guard again. Now they’re up. Inside leg kick from Fredo. Rony misses a wild left, then lands a right. He gets hit in the pills again. Rony’s looking pretty miserable. And we’re back. Spinning kick glances Rony’s ribs. Rony goes for a takedown to end the round, fails, and they keep going after the bell for some reason.

Rony wins a unanimous decision, 29-28 across the board.

Cezar Ferreira vs. Sergio Moraes are on deck for the middleweight TUF crown.

Sergio dances into the cage with some of the tightest shorts of all time.

Round 1: They touch and it’s on. Sergio charges and swings wildly. Cezar lands a Capoeira kick. He grabs Sergio by the back of the head and punches him in the face. Cezar lands a knee to the body. Sergio misses another wild hook. Body kick by Sergio. Then a leg kick. Cezar with an overhand left. Cezar charges in, Sergio backs him up with a big right. Elbow by Sergio. Cezar kicks Sergio in the pills. DAMN, the replay shows directly to the pills. That had to suck. And he’s ready to go. Sergio swings wildly again, blocked by Cezar. Wild exchange by both guys, Sergio gets the better of it. Cezar with a front kick, and a high kick that’s blocked. That’s the round.

Round 2: Sergio has a weird half smile on his face, and we’re set to go again. Cezar lands a left. Sergio tries to pull guard. Cezar drops Sergio. Lands a wheel kick, drops Sergio again, and lets him up. Cezar misses a high kick. So does Sergio. Sergio shoots, gets easily stuffed. Cezar with an overhand right, comes up short on a flying knee. The crowd chants. Goldy informs us that it’s “something in Portuguese.” Cezar with a kick to the body. Sergio is battering Cezar with wild punches. Cezar fights back with a few of his own. This just got a hell of a lot better. Goldy fucks it up as usual by comparing it to Forrest/Stephan. The round closes with the crowd going nuts.

Round 3: They embrace to start the third. Front kick to the body by Cezar. He drops Sergio with an uppercut, and let’s him up. Cezar is terrified to go to the ground with Sergio, second time he let him up. Cezar misses a kick, as does Sergio. Now Sergio lands one to the body. Cezar barely brushes Sergio with a pair of front kicks. Sergio lands a straight right that stuns Cezar. Cezar whiffs an overhand left. Cezar charges forward, misses. Sergio tags Cezar. They aren’t really throwing much. Cezar is hesitant, then drops Sergio with a straight left. He’s kicking the legs, still will not jump on top of Sergio. The round ends with a tough decision for the judges.

Cezar wins a unanimous decision, 29-28, 30-27. and 30-27 to become the middleweight TUF winner.

Rogan tells Cezar he’s the first Ultimate Fighter winner. That would be cool if there weren’t already about 90 seasons in the books.

And the main event is next. Rich Franklin vs. Wanderlei Silva

Rich gets a raw deal. He’s mocked as a ‘company man,’ as Dana White’s boy. But I gots to imagine being D. White’s boy comes with some sweet bennies. Rich makes that long dough, and word has it he only has to caddy when Dana AND Lorenzzo hit the greens, so that aint that bad. Plus they know Rich is always going to come in-shape, win or lose he always fights his guts out, and this cat will have a black eye, which the medical community is at a loss to explain.

Hey, some things are just unexplainable in this life: JFK assassination, Loch Ness Monster, how Heidi Klum spent all those years married to that ugly mother fucker Seal, and how in the name of all that is holy Rich Franklin has had a Goddamn black eye for the past six years.

Anyway, considering their limited options, the UFC must be given credit for finding Wandy a suitable replacement, even if it is a rematch. At a catchweight. With absolutely no divisional relevance whatsoever. The only better option would have been to get Wandy’s plastic surgeon in the cage with him so he could get some revenge on that bastard for doing whateverthefuck weird thing he did to Wandy’s face that makes him look like a serial killer from the Dagobah system. And to further expound on that topic, I never in a million years thought I’d say this, but Wandy’s opponent actually looks creepier than he does. What is with Rich’s hair? Midlife crisis? Lost a bet? He should just buy a Vet already and be done with it. No need to go around at Rich’s age looking like a soft ass teenage boy who wears Capris and flip flops.

Damn, Rich rolls out to some AC/DC, but he’s wearing some pink ass shorts, small ones too. Weird.

Wandy comes out to some fist pump shit, looking real intense though.

I’m having an extremely difficult time focusing on my duties what with Rich’s hair n’ all. That must be the point though. It must be a tactical move. There’s just no other explanation as to why someone would choose to walk around looking like that. This is war, god dammit, and hilarious distractions are part of the mutha fuckin’ competition. That was Sun Tzu, if I’m not mistaken. We must never forget what the late, great Patrice O’Neal said about African rebels, how they fight wearing “sweat pants and tuxedo shoes.” You think that’s just cause they lack uniform funds? Sheeeeeeeeeeeet. That’s strategy, cuz. They know you look at em laughing your ass off, with their sweat pants, dress shoes, UNLV t-shirts and pink Yankee caps. But then they start machete hacking your fucking arms off and you know they aint playin’. Then it’s too late. It’s no different than Rich’s Dumb and Dumber hairdo.

Round 1: Wandy opens up with a kick to the legs. Rich throws a kick, gets blasted in the face. Wandy lands a left. Rich with a straight left, and again,. Rich with a jab. High kick by Wandy, caught by Rich. Rich lands a short hook, stuns Wandy. Rich with another good shot. Rich with a nice punch kick combo. Jab by Rich. Wandy fires back with a right. Rich with a body kick. Wandy lands a kick to the face. Another, blocked by Rich though. Rich lands a couple shots. Rich with a high kick of his own, and round 1 is in the books.

Round 2: Wandy skims a right, lands a leg kick, then falls. They trade big misses. Wandy goes upstairs, Rich gets out of the way. Rich with a nice shot to the head. Rich unloads with a few. And again. Wandy jabs. Wandy misses, Rich lands to the body. Wandy lands to the head. Rich goes to the body again, and to the head. He’s picking Wandy apart. Wandy strikes back though, lands a couple hooks, rocks Rich, OH MY GOD and knocks Franklin on his ass, swarming on him. Rich grabs a leg, and is barely surviving. Wandy is kicking his ass! WOW, Franklin survives the round, but he’s looking rough.

Round 3: Franklin looks OK, but he took a whooping. Let’s see how he holds up here. Rich kicks to the body. Now he punches to the body. Wandy with a head kick, blocked. Rich is jabbing away. Rich lands a solid kick to Wandy’s ribs. Rich just keeps sticking that jab out there. Wandy isn’t throwing anything. Another body kick by Franklin. Straight left by Rich. Wandy with a nice jab, and answered with another body kick. Rich with a pair of straight lefts, then scores a takedown. Franklin moves to half guard, and is delivering some nice elbows and punches to close out the round.

Round 4: Wandy jumps in, misses a hook. Rich misses a shot, Wandy connects with a short hook. Rich goes to the body again. Rich jabs, then connects with a straight left. And another. Then a right hook. Wandy looks rough. Hard shot to the body. Rich is just standing on the outside and jabbing Wandy to death. Oof, Rich takes a nasty one to the sack. That’s what you get for wearing those tiny pink shorts though. Rich looks recovered and here we go. Rich lands a shot, Wandy answers back. Another jab by Rich. Wandy with a left to the grill. And a right. Rich sticks a straight left. Wandy tags Rich to end the round.

Round 5: Nice bro hug to start things off. And Wandy blocks a jab with his forehead. Wandy kicks high, Rich isn’t there to eat it. Another jab by Rich. Wandy with a nice left hook. Rich is jabbing away. Wandy wades in with a knee, eats a shot for it. Another jab. Rich lands a left. Franklin is dancing around, jabbing away. Not a whole lot happening in this final round. Wandy gets in his face, looking to end hard, lands a huge right. And another. And another. This is the tsunami we’ve been waiting for. Thanks for waiting until the end of the fight, Wandy. Silva swarming, Franklin ends the round by knocking Wandy down with a short shot. Rich should take this decision.

Rich Franklin takes the unanimous decision with 49-46 across the board.

The translations are killing me. Bascially, Rich showed off his Portuguese, and Wandy fights for the people.

That’s it people, thanks for getting your chill on with me. We’ll be back tomorrow to analyze this shit.

UFC 146: Dos Santos vs. Mir — Live Main Card Results and Commentary


(Damn, Junior…give away your gameplan much? / Photo courtesy of MMAFighting.com)

After a preliminary card dominated by relatively normal-sized men — borrrrring! — we’ve finally arrived at tonight’s central theme: Big sons-of-bitches. That’s right, UFC 146‘s main card features five consecutive heavyweight fights, most of which look pretty damn entertaining on paper. Can massive underdog Frank Mir pull off Impossible Career Comeback #2, or will he succumb to the buzzsaw-like boxing of Junior Dos Santos, just like so many before him? Can Lavar Johnson score two knockouts in the same month (!), or is he in over his head — figuratively, and otherwise — against Stefan Struve? And does Roy Nelson really think he’s doing himself any favors with that ratty-ass gray beard?


(Damn, Junior…give away your gameplan much? / Photo courtesy of MMAFighting.com)

After a preliminary card dominated by relatively normal-sized men — borrrrring! — we’ve finally arrived at tonight’s central theme: Big sons-of-bitches. That’s right, UFC 146‘s main card features five consecutive heavyweight fights, most of which look pretty damn entertaining on paper. Can massive underdog Frank Mir pull off Impossible Career Comeback #2, or will he succumb to the buzzsaw-like boxing of Junior Dos Santos, just like so many before him? Can Lavar Johnson score two knockouts in the same month (!), or is he in over his head — figuratively, and otherwise — against Stefan Struve? And does Roy Nelson really think he’s doing himself any favors with that ratty-ass gray beard?

Live-blogging the UFC 146 main card for us is Anthony Gannon, who will be stacking round-by-round results after the jump starting at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT. Refresh the page for all the latest, and throw down your thoughts in the comments section. Thanks for being here, guys.

Well, shit. Due to a poorly timed server meltdown, we weren’t able to do the liveblog tonight; our deepest apologies. Hopefully most of you caught the pay-per-view because it was entertaining as hell, and none of the five heavyweight fights made it out of the second round. In short: Junior Dos Santos is still the UFC heavyweight champion, thanks to a dominant striking performance against Frank Mir, and Cain Velasquez made Antonio Silva‘s face look bloodier than anyone’s since Joe Stevenson. The full UFC 146 results are below; we’ll talk more tomorrow.

Main Card
Junior dos Santos def. Frank Mir via TKO, 3:04 of round 2
Cain Velasquez def. Antonio Silva via TKO, 3:36 of round 1
Roy Nelson def. Dave Herman via KO, 0:51 of round 1
Stipe Mio?i? def. Shane del Rosario via TKO, 3:14 of round 2
Stefan Struve def. Lavar Johnson via submission (armbar), 1:05 of round 1

Preliminary Card on FX
Darren Elkins def. Diego Brandao via unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)
Jamie Varner def. Edson Barboza via TKO, 3:23 of round 1
C.B. Dollaway def. Jason Miller via unanimous decision, (29-28 x 2, 30-26)
Dan Hardy def. Duane Ludwig via KO, 3:51 of round 1

Preliminary Card on Facebook
Paul Sass def. Jacob Volkmann via submission (triangle armbar), 1:54 of round 1
Glover Teixeira def. Kyle Kingsbury via submission (arm-triangle choke), 1:53 of round 1
Mike Brown def. Daniel Pineda via unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)

Chan Sung Jung vs. Dustin Poirier ‘Fight of the Night’ Video Highlights

(Props: FoxSports)

The main event of last night’s UFC on FUEL TV 3 event blew past its already high expectations. “The Korean Zombie” Chan Sung Jung and Dustin Poirier set a frenetic pace for over three rounds, with Jung dominating the fight both in the standup and on the ground. In the end, Jung rocked Poirier with punches and a flying knee, and put “Diamond” to sleep on the mat with a d’arce choke at the 1:07 mark of round four. You can check out highlights from their scrap above, including an excerpt from Jung’s astounding grappling clinic in round two.

The match earned both men $40,000 Fight of the Night bonuses, and Jung picked up an additional $40k for the event’s Submission of the Night (“What about meeeeeeee?!” – The McKenzietine). Knockout of the Night went to Tom Lawlor, who celebrated his birthday then starched Jason MacDonald in just 50 seconds.

After the jump: Dustin Poirier gets emotional in a post-fight interview with Ariel Helwani, and full results from UFC on FUEL TV: Korean Zombie vs. Poirier.


(Props: FoxSports)

The main event of last night’s UFC on FUEL TV 3 event blew past its already high expectations. “The Korean Zombie” Chan Sung Jung and Dustin Poirier set a frenetic pace for over three rounds, with Jung dominating the fight both in the standup and on the ground. In the end, Jung rocked Poirier with punches and a flying knee, and put “Diamond” to sleep on the mat with a d’arce choke at the 1:07 mark of round four. You can check out highlights from their scrap above, including an excerpt from Jung’s astounding grappling clinic in round two.

The match earned both men $40,000 Fight of the Night bonuses, and Jung picked up an additional $40k for the event’s Submission of the Night (“What about meeeeeeee?!” – The McKenzietine). Knockout of the Night went to Tom Lawlor, who celebrated his birthday then starched Jason MacDonald in just 50 seconds.

After the jump: Dustin Poirier gets emotional in a post-fight interview with Ariel Helwani, and full results from UFC on FUEL TV: Korean Zombie vs. Poirier.


(Props: youtube.com/fueltv)

MAIN CARD
Chan Sung Jung def. Dustin Poirier via technical submission (d’arce choke), 1:07 of round 4
Amir Sadollah def. Jorge Lopez via split decision (29-28 x 2, 28-29)
Donald Cerrone def. Jeremy Stephens via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
Yves Jabouin def. Jeff Hougland via unanimous decision (30-27 x 2, 30-26)
Igor Pokrajac def. Fabio Maldonado via unanimous decision (29-28 x 2, 30-27)
Tom Lawlor def. Jason MacDonald via KO, 0:50 of round 1

PRELIMINARY CARD
– Brad Tavares def. Dongi Yang via unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)
– Cody McKenzie def. Marcus LeVesseur via submission (guillotine choke), 3:05 of round 1
– T.J. Grant def. Carlo Prater via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
Rafael Dos Anjos def. Kamal Shalorus via submission (rear-naked choke), 1:40 of round 1
– Johnny Eduardo def. Jeff Curran via unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)
– Francisco Rivera def. Alex Soto via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)