Midnight Mania! Yoel Romero Used ‘Dirty’ Tactics? No Way?!?

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Paulo Costa and Yoel Romero’s bout at UFC 241 this past Saturday was one for the ages. The “Figh…

UFC 241 Cormier v Miocic 2

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Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight!

Welcome to Midnight Mania!

Paulo Costa and Yoel Romero’s bout at UFC 241 this past Saturday was one for the ages. The “Fight of the Night” worthy brawl saw both muscle men land monstrous shots, but neither went down, resulting in a close decision win for Costa after 15 minutes of combat.

As is often the case with Yoel Romero bouts, there is controversy afterward. Post-fight, Costa accused Romero of utilizing ‘dirty’ tactics. Let’s break down his pair of accusations (transcription courtesy of MMAFighting):

“He’s a nice guy, but he’s dirty. In the first round, when I make a hook in his face, he went down then got up very quickly, and I say man I will knock him out in the first round because he feel my punch, my first punch, and I started hunting him in the octagon. And when I close to knock him out, he point on something, anywhere, I don’t know. Like look there Paulo, and I lose concentration, because he point something, maybe his mouth piece fall.”

On this instance, I have little sympathy for “The Eraser.” The rules say to “protect yourself at all times,” and it’s a fighter’s job to remain focused despite any potential distractions. His second point may carry more weight, however:

“The second thing, my knee not hit his balls. My knee hit his stomach, and he said, ‘Oh, you hit my balls,’ and he jumped back, and the referee (said) stop, stop. I don’t know him deep, but he’s a nice guy, he looks like a nice guy, but his kind of fight is not clean.

In this case, it was really hard to tell from the replay video. The knee potentially clipped the cup on the way up to the stomach, but much of the force seemed to land to the mid-section. In all likelihood, Romero’s drop to the mat afterward was likely a bit of a show to draw a rest period.

Costa should really consider himself lucky, as this is all pretty mild considering Romero’s history. The Cuban is a master of gamesmanship: the art of pushing the line and excelling in grey areas of the rules and spot. Some might call that cheating. Either way, Romero’s use of a tactical cage grab (against “Jacare” Souza) or adding excessive Vaseline between rounds to buy more time (against Tim Kennedy) were far more obvious and fight-altering moments.

Still, none of Romero’s gamesmanship has cost him in any way. If you’re not cheating, you’re not trying!

Insomnia

When McGregor drops the nonsense and reflects, it’s usually pretty interesting.

This applies to mothers as well (hi Mom!).

I haven’t yet decided if this is the worst or best promo I’ve ever seen?

Quality trash talk from Aljamain Sterling.

Cool fight art will always have a place on Midnight Mania.

Watching Saenchai move around is always fun, and the second pic is perfectly timed!

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Sparring today with @spencer_yokkao

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Sorry @spencer_yokkao

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Breaking news: Shaq is still gigantic.

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Big ass Shaq

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Slips, rips, and KO clips

Dana White’s Tuesday Night Contender Series helps this section each week. The first finish below is pure pressure:

The fence is a bad place to take a break…

This is the textbook definition of “right on the button.”

Random Land

Ocean creature camouflage is always hugely impressive.

Midnight Music: It’s easy and understandable to write-off modern country music as a pop garbage. For the most part, that’s correct — much of what comes out of Nashville these days is hip-hop stripped of all the interesting aspects and aimed at white people afraid of black music. Sturgill Simpson, however, is a fantastic country singer-songwriter soon to release another album. Accordingly, I re-listened to his excellent 2016 LP A Sailor’s Guide to Earth.

Sleep well Maniacs! More martial arts madness is always on the way.

Respect! Schaffroth (And His Dense Bones) Have A Plan For Fortune At Bellator 225

Bellator 225 takes place at Webster Bank Arena in Bridgeport, Conn., this weekend (Sat., Aug. 24, 2019, featuring a Heavyweight rematch between Matt Mitrione (13-6, 1 NC) versus Sergei Kharitonov (28-6, 2 NC), who will try to redo a fight t…

Bellator 225 takes place at Webster Bank Arena in Bridgeport, Conn., this weekend (Sat., Aug. 24, 2019, featuring a Heavyweight rematch between Matt Mitrione (13-6, 1 NC) versus Sergei Kharitonov (28-6, 2 NC), who will try to redo a fight that ended in 15 seconds because of a foul earlier this year.

That’s not the only pairing of man mountains on deck for Saturday night. Indeed, Bellator 225’s main card is a slew of big boy bouts led by promising Heavyweight prospects Tyrell Fortune (6-0) and Rudy Schaffroth (6-0, 1 NC), as each looks to hand the other his first career mixed martial arts (MMA) loss.

Schaffroth is known for bringing quick and decisive violence to his opponents. His professional MMA debut only lasted 11 seconds, and thus far in his career no fight has made it past the first round. He has finished four straight by form of knockout, including both Bellator fights so far. Fortune, though, could be the opponent to finally test him. A blue chip Olympic hopeful when he signed with Bellator MMA in 2015, Fortune has quickly adjusted to the MMA format, developing his hands into lethal weapons. In fact, four of six wins (67 percent) are via knockout, including his last two fights in a row.

Schaffroth recently chatted with MMAmania.com about his upcoming showdown with Fortune at Bellator 225, how he got interested in MMA and much more.

“I was a wrestler. I grew up wrestling. My brothers were six and eight years older than I am, and at that time when I was a kid I just wanted to do everything they did. They wrestled and so I just pestered my mom everything I could to get on the wrestling mat.”

Even though that’s often a straight line into the sport if you’re a gifted athlete, Schaffroth says things took a hard left when his collegiate life never got on track.

“Down the line I went to college and wrestled in college, and I was trying to make football happen. I wanted to play football, be a football player, but school didn’t really work out in my favor. I had some troubles with that. After my second time losing a scholarship to grades and academics, I found myself in the oil field working as a derrick hand.”

Schaffroth quickly realized that wasn’t the life he had envisioned for himself and resolved to see if his wrestling skills could translate into being a professional fighter.

“I had a few experiences where it was time to leave. I needed to come home and try to be a professional athlete and use my abilities before they were gone. So I started training with Matt Lindland at Team Quest and started my amateur career, and that was back in 2013.”

It didn’t take long for Schaffroth to realize had finally found his calling inside the cage.

“Three minutes and three seconds is my longest fight. Tyrell apparently doesn’t agree but it’s my athleticism, my athletic ability is what allows me to move (so fast). I have solid dense bones, and I’m able to hit what I’m trying to hit and move my hands quick enough to create enough force to put ‘em down. That was all pretty much just raw ability.”

I couldn’t let the words “Tyrell doesn’t agree” go without finding out why Mr. Fortune seems to have a problem with calling Schaffroth an athlete.

“I was told that when he was asked how he felt about the fight, he told that person he wasn’t worried about me (because) I’m not an athlete. I don’t think Tyrell respects me, I don’t think he’s ever respected my abilities, I don’t think he’s ever thought I was on his level or as an equal. I’m gonna take advantage of that wholeheartedly.”

Perhaps that disrespect comes from the fact they crossed paths on the mat at Clackamas Community College before their professional careers began.

“He thinks I asked for this fight, he’s taking it personal apparently, he thinks I’ve gone out of my way to call him out and make this about him. His name was on the other end of the phone call five weeks ago and that’s about it.”

He’s okay with hard feelings, because Schaffroth says Fortune will have just as hard of a time beating him in the cage.

“I’m taller and longer than Tyrell is, I have the reach advantage, so that’s going to be in my favor. This isn’t my first idea for an opponent, but I’m confident and I’ve been training, I’m going to have to fight everybody in the weight class eventually to get where I want to go. Now is the time. Bellator wants it to happen now, they sign the paychecks, so I’ve got to make it happen.”

And he’s not going to rest at changing Tyrell’s fortunes — he’s already got his eye on one of the main eventers of this card.

“I think (Matt) Mitrione and I are very similar. We’re pretty close to the same size, and we both have that quick explosive athleticism. I think I would like to face him. Matching me would probably be the worst case scenario (for him). Other than that, I would probably like to fight Fedor (Emelianenko) and get one back for Chael.”

Schaffroth is not just saying that idly. His history with “The American Gangster” goes back a long way.

“I train with him currently. I was training with him for that fight against Fedor, and then he retired, so he hasn’t been around but… when we changed to American Top Team he was there, and when we’ve been at Gracie he’s been there. Chael is one of the reasons I got into fighting. He was around at CCC when I was wrestling, when I was competing. When I was wrestling with Tyrell Fortune when we were teammates, Chael was coming in and working out with us. That was what seared in the back of my mind I could fight if I wanted.”

And want he does — he wants to make sure he finally gets his respect on Saturday night.

Complete audio of our interview is embedded above, and complete coverage of Bellator 225: “Mitrione vs. Kharitonov 2” resides here at MMAmania.com all week long.

To check out the latest Bellator MMA-related news and notes be sure to hit up our comprehensive news archive right here.

McGregor Reacts To Diaz Win…But Will There Be A Trilogy?

Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images

After Nate Diaz scored a win over Anthony Pettis in the co-main event of UFC 241 last Saturday night (Aug. 17, 2019) in Anaheim, Calif. (highlights), most expected the Stockton sl…

UFC 202: Diaz v McGregor 2

Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images

After Nate Diaz scored a win over Anthony Pettis in the co-main event of UFC 241 last Saturday night (Aug. 17, 2019) in Anaheim, Calif. (highlights), most expected the Stockton slugger to call for a trilogy fight against Conor McGregor.

Nate, though, threw a curve ball and instead called for a gangster vs gangster showdown against Jorge Masvidal, the most-talked about man in the Welterweight division at the moment.

Still, McGregor was watching and he took to social media a couple of days removed from the fight to congratulate Diaz on a motivating victory after three years away from the fight game. He also understands why Nate didn’t call for a third bout between the two of them.

3 years to the day myself and this Mexican warrior went to war. Congrats on the win this weekend Nate, it was motivating to see it for my own comeback. I don’t blame you not mentioning me for the trilogy bout post fight, you know what I’m like when I get going. Vicious. I loved the round 3 style from round 1 that you implemented. It’s what I was hoping you would implement for this bout and was glad to see you do it. I’ll be prepared for it when we go again. If we go again. If not, respect always. A war for the ages. No bitch talk. Just real shit.

Indeed, the two men split their first two fights, with Diaz submitting Conor at UFC 196, only for “Notorious” to get revenge at UFC 202, which just so happened to go down exactly three years ago. So McGregor holding off to publish this tweet today is no coincidence.

That said, despite not being Nate’s first option at the moment, McGregor does seem to be in line to face Diaz at least one more time down the road. For now, McGregor — who was recently involved in another public dust-up — will have to shift his focus on another willing foe.

I hear this man is looking for a fight.

DWCS 25 Highlights: Phil Rowe Finishes Leon Shabazyan

Things didn’t look good for Phil Rowe earlier on against Leon Shabazyan, but he took over in a big way. Rowe and Shabazyan collided inside the UFC Apex in Las Vegas, Nevada. Shabazyan had great success in the opening frame. Rowe struggled to use …

Things didn’t look good for Phil Rowe earlier on against Leon Shabazyan, but he took over in a big way. Rowe and Shabazyan collided inside the UFC Apex in Las Vegas, Nevada. Shabazyan had great success in the opening frame. Rowe struggled to use his reach effectively, but that changed in the second stanza. Rowe […]

The post DWCS 25 Highlights: Phil Rowe Finishes Leon Shabazyan appeared first on MMA News.

LIVE! ‘Contender Series’ Results, Play-By-Play Updates

Photo by Chris Unger/DWTNCS LLC

The world’s “toughest job interview” continues this evening as 10 fighters “vie to fulfill their dreams of earning a UFC contract.” We’re not over this week’s hump just yet, but there’s still cause for cele…

Dana White’s Contender Series Brazil:

Photo by Chris Unger/DWTNCS LLC

The world’s “toughest job interview” continues this evening as 10 fighters “vie to fulfill their dreams of earning a UFC contract.”

We’re not over this week’s hump just yet, but there’s still cause for celebration. Dana White’s “Contender Series” once again returns to ESPN+ and Fight Pass tonight (Tues., Aug. 20, 2019) with 10 more ambitious up-and-comers looking for an Ultimate Fighting Championships (UFC) roster spot. Last week’s festivities saw three fighters secure UFC contracts and one other, main event winner William Knight, walk away with a developmental contract.

Leon Shahbazyan (7-1), brother of UFC prospect Edmen Shahbazyan, gets another shot after failing his medicals earlier this season ahead of a fight with Brok Weaver, challenging the six-fight win streak of Philip “The Fresh Prince” Rowe (6-2). Fans will also get to see The Ultimate Fighter (TUF) 27 competitor Ricky Steele (5-0) face Ring of Combat Bantamweight champion Phil Caracappa (8-0).

‘Contender Series’ Quick Results:

Leon Shahbazyan vs. Philip Rowe — Rowe def. Shahbazyan by TKO (punches) at 0:16 of Round Three
Marcos Brigagao vs. Jamal Pogues — Pogues def. Brigagao by unanimous decision (30-27 x3)
Desmond Torres vs. Steve Garcia Jr. — Garcia def. Torres by TKO (punches and elbows) at 4:35 of Round One
Micol Di Segni vs. Mallory Martin — Martin def. Di Signi by unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)
Ricky Steele vs. Phil Caracappa — Steele def. Caracappa by split decision (28-29, 29-28 x2)

‘Contender Series’ Play-by-Play Results:

170 lbs.: Leon Shahbazyan vs. Philip Rowe

Round one: Both men staying at range early. Shahbazyan on the front foot. Head kick attempt. One minute in. Body kick from Rowe. Elbow from Shahbazyan on the fence. Leg kick lands. Shahbazyan catches a kick and drops Rowe with a combination. He tries to pound him out, but Rowe makes it to his feet. Shahbazyan still on the advance and throwing heat. Good body shot as Rowe throws back two minutes in. Body kick lands for Shahbazyan. Rowe still circling, seems to have recovered. Right cross by Shahbazyan and they trade rights. 1-2 connects for him. Left hook upstairs. Two minutes to go,

Rowe tries a front kick. Shahbazyan winging his right hand, eats an uppercut and comes back with a 3-2. Rowe tries a jumping knee, lands a leg kick. Shahbazyan comes back with a 1-2 to the body. One minute to go. Good right cross by Rowe, looking to open up on the fence. Shahbazyan forces him back with a kick. Body kick lands. A couple more. 10-9 Shahbazyan.

Round two: 2-1 and low kick land for Rowe. Shahbazyan with a front kick downstairs and he shoots on the fence. Rowe reverses position. One minute in. Still keeping Shahbazyan on the fence. Shahbazyan reverses and they start trading. Rowe hurts Shahbazyan and he’s on the attack, unloading everything he’s got. Shahbazyan manages to hit a takedown into half guard, avoiding a sweep attempt two minutes in. The next sweep attempt is successful and puts Rowe on top in guard. Shahbazyan with a body triangle. Two minutes to go.

Shahbazyan scoots to the fence. Rowe postures up for some solid punches. One minute to go. Elbows from Rowe. Harder ones soon after. Rowe stands over him and just blasts him with punches and hammerfists until the bell. Shahbazyan doesn’t look like he’s in great shape after that. 10-9 Rowe.

Round three: Rowe opens with a right cross, then another that has Shahbazyan retreating. Rowe forces him back to the fence and tears into his head and body with punches until Shahbazyan goes down.

Final result: Rowe def. Shahbazyan by TKO (punches)


205 lbs.: Marcos Brigagao vs. Jamal Pogues

Round one: Both men come out trading, landing huge shots. Pogues seems to get the better of it, but tries to shoot. Stuffed. Brigagao with a knee to the body, then a good body kick. Pogues ducks a left straight for a takedown into guard. Brigagao trying to kick him off, then threaten a leg, but can’t do so. Pogues postured up, avoids a triangle. Two minutes in. Brigagao works his way up from an omoplata sweep attempt. He backs Pogues to the fence, gets taken down again. Pogues looking for the back. Two minutes to go.

Pogues transitions to an armbar attempt. Struggling to break Brigagao’s grip. He can’t do so but wins the scramble to stay on top. Brigagao kicks his way up, pressed against the fence. They separate. One minute to go. Pogues tries a jumping knee in the clinch. Pogues shoots under a three-piece for another takedown into guard. Brigagao threatens with a half-formed triangle attempt. 10-9 Pogues.

Round two: Pogues tries a couple of early head kicks. Counter right by Pogues and he ties up. One minute in. Heavy punches by Pogues on the break. Brigagao tries to push forward and Pogues again ducks a straight left to take him down. On top in half guard. Brigagao regains full guard. Two minutes in. Pogues trying to pass, unable to. He postures out of an armbar attempt, lands punches as Brigagao tries to stand. Clean head kick connects for him as Brigagao makes it to his feet but the Brazilian somehow absorbs it. Two minutes to go.

Another duck under a straight left, lands in side control this time. Brigagao uses the fence to stand more quickly this time. Knee to the body by Pogues, body kick by Brigagao. 2-3 from Pogues with a minute to go. Straight right. Clash of heads, body kick by Pogues. Brigagao still marching after him, to his credit. Pogues exits with a right hand. 10-9 Pogues.

Round three: Brigagao fires an inside leg kick, lands a counter left as Pogues opens up. Pogues fakes a shot, lands a right hook. Counter right straight. Body kick by Brigagao. Another faked shot to right hand from Pogues. He ducks another left for another takedown a minute in. Pogues posturing up, landing some decent punches as he passes. Brigagao tries a triangle, Pogues throws his legs aside and looks for the back. Brigagao makes his way up, continues his forward march. Counter right from Pogues with two minutes to go.

Another counter right. He ducks a punch, ties up. They separate, another double-leg by Pogues into guard with a minute to go. Brigagao rolls to his knees and Pogues grabs the front headlock. Brigagao wades after him, shoved to the mat. 10-9 Pogues.

Final result: Pogues def. Brigagao by unanimous decision


135 lbs.: Desmond Torres vs. Steve Garcia Jr.

Round one: Garcia goes for an immediate takedown, can’t establish. Torres puts him on the fence. Body kick from Garcia as they separate, Torres ties up again and looks for a standing back take. One minute in. He nearly gets the back take, can’t complete it. Kicks from Garcia, hard uppercut. Torres lands a leg kick, eats an elbow, comes back with a right hand. Combination by Garcia, hard elbow inside two minutes in. Torres shoots and runs the pipe, can’t establish. Pressing him against the fence. Garcia trying to reverse, can’t do so. Now he does and changes levels. Two minutes to go.

Torres defending with a kimura grip, eats a knee. Garcia with an elbow on the break. Two-piece lands. He sends one a series of body kicks. Step-in knee blocked but he hurts Torres with a left hand. Garcia on the attack, lands an elbow and uppercut. Spinning elbow attempt, body shot. Torres falls under the onslaught and Garcia pounds him out.

Final result: Garcia def. Torres by TKO (punches and elbows)


115 lbs.: Micol Di Segni vs. Mallory Martin

Round one: Martin lands an early knee. 1-2. Another 1-2, Di Signi answers with a right cross. Overhand right by Di Signi. Outlanding Martin so far. 1-2 from Martin and she shoots a minute in. Good takedown into side control. Di Signi regains half guard. Back to side, back to half. Two minutes in. Short elbows from Martin. She looks for mount, settles for side control, immediately back to half guard. More short shots. Two minutes to go.

Di Signi rolls to her knees, works her way up. Martin uses a reap to take her back down into half guard. One minute to go. Di Signi rolls to her knees and stands, has to fight her way out of a guillotine. Jab lands for Martin. 10-9 Martin.

Round two: Back to trading punches in the center. Body shot from Di Signi. Overhand right. Shifting left. Martin looking to trade with her, eats a 1-2 and lands one of her own. One minute in. Martin low kick, Di Signi jabs. Another 1-2 from Martin, tries to shoot and eats a 1-2 in return. Low kick, body jab by Di Signi. Martin jab met by a 1-2. They trade rights. Another overhand by Di Signi two minutes in. Trading in the center. Clean 1-2 from Di Signi and Martin takes her to the fence. She drags her into side control with two minutes to go.

Di Signi regains half guard. One minute to go. Di Signi rolls to her knees and stands, trading rights on the break. More right hands by Di Signi. Wild spinning backfist attempt. 1-2 from Martin in return. Di Signi tries to spin and gets taken down this time into guard. 10-9 Di Signi.

Round three: Back to trading in the center. Neither landing super clean. Hard 1-2 from Di Signi as I say that. One minute in. Right hand lands for Martin. Di Signi comes back with an overhand and Martin shoots. Outside trip puts her in side control. Di Signi stands, dragged back down. Martin looking for the back two minutes in. One hook in on a turtling Di Signi, landing punches. Di Signi works her way to her feet and lands some left hands in the clinch. Martin reverses position on the fence, eats some knees. Two minutes to go.

They separate. Di Signi tries to spin again. Glancing 1-2, right hand downstairs. Superman punch connects. 1-2 upstairs, body shot, right cross. She tries another Superman punch. 1-2 from Martin connects. One minute in. Martin knee, Di Signi right hand. Di Signi swinging big, but not landing. Overhand right lands inside. They trade jabs. Martin shoots, stuffed. Close round. 10-9 Di Signi.

Final result: Martin def. Di Signi by unanimous decision


135 lbs.: Ricky Steele vs. Phil Caracappa

Round one: Caracappa slips throwing a kick. He tries to blitz, eats a pair of low kicks. He wades into the clinch against the fence. One minute in. Steele separates 25 seconds later. Low kick from Caracappa. Steele switching stance, tries a head kick and lands a leg kick. He lands a counter knee and defends a takedown against the cage. Two minutes in. Caracappa gets him to a knee. Steele working to stand, Caracappa pulls his foot out. Steele stands and separates with two minutes to go.

Front kick to the body by Steele. Head kick attempt. Flicking out some more kicks, lands one to the thigh. Caracappa blitzes in and grabs a body lock. He completes an outside reap into half guard with a minute to go. Steele tries to scramble to his feet and Caracappa jumps on his back. Steele shakes him off, sets up in guard. 10-9 Caracappa.

Round two: Steele counters a takedown and lands on top in half guard against the fence. Caracappa trying to stand a minute in. Steele fires a knee on the way up, tries to change levels. Knees from Steele. They separate and Caracappa tries to flurry. Caracappa back on the advance, lands a pair of hooks and shoots. Elbows from Steele two minutes in. Caracappa gets a body lock. Ref wants more action. Two minutes to go.

Steele reverses and knees his thighs. Elbow attempt. He separates for a second to land a right hand. One minute to go. Knee and shoulder strike. He tries a spinning elbow and lands a right hand before clinching again. Caracappa slips on a kick after separating. 10-9 Steele.

Round three: Caracappa again wading in, flinging haymakers. Steele flicking out kicks, lands a leg kick. Steele just pushes him away when Caracappa threatens a takedown. Jab from Steele, body shots by Caracappa a minute in. Low-high hooks from Caracappa and he shoots again. Steele reverses on the fence two minutes in, lands a hard elbow upstairs. Shoulder strikes. Two minutes to go.

Steele has to know he’s not getting a contract for this, right? Suddenly, Caracappa blasts him with a pair of elbows that visibly rattle Steele. He keeps throwing, pulls guard on a guillotine when Steele shoots. One minute to go. Steele waits it out, pops his head free. Both throwing on the ground. 10-9 Steele.

Final result: Steele def. Caracappa by split decision


For more “Contender Series” news, notes, and updates, including lists of those who receive contracts, be sure to hit up our comprehensive archive right here.

McGregor ‘motivated’ for comeback after Diaz’s win at UFC 241

Photo by Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images

Conor McGregor had some congratulatory words for Nate Diaz after UFC 241 over the weekend. Nate Diaz put on an impressive performance on Saturday against Anthony Pettis. What made…

UFC 202: Diaz v McGregor 2

Photo by Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images

Conor McGregor had some congratulatory words for Nate Diaz after UFC 241 over the weekend.

Nate Diaz put on an impressive performance on Saturday against Anthony Pettis. What made it more notable for some was that it was Diaz’s first fight after three years in the sidelines.

Rival Conor McGregor apparently saw the fight unfold, and had nothing but congratulatory words. According to Conor, Diaz’s performance and victory motivates him for his own Octagon return, whenever that may be.

McGregor laid out his message in a recent Facebook post.

3 years to the day myself and this Mexican animal went to war.
Congrats on the win this weekend Nate, it was motivating…

Posted by Conor McGregor on Tuesday, August 20, 2019

3 years to the day myself and this Mexican animal went to war. Congrats on the win this weekend Nate, it was motivating to see it for my own comeback.

I don’t blame you not mentioning me for the trilogy bout post fight, you know what I’m like when I get going. Vicious.

I loved the round 3 style from round 1 that you implemented. It’s what I was hoping you would implement for this bout and was glad to see you do it.

I’ll be prepared for it when we go again. If we go again. If not, respect always. A war for the ages. No b-tch talk. Just real sh-t.

Diaz is seemingly uninterested in a third fight with McGregor as of the moment and is more keen on fighting Jorge Masvidal for the “baddest motherf—r belt.”

McGregor, meanwhile, is in hot water again, after a video of him punching a man in Dublin bar recently surfaced.