Anderson Silva Continues To Blame Tainted Supplements For Failed Drug Test

Former UFC middleweight champion Anderson Silva continues to speak out about his latest failed drug test. “The Spider” is facing up to a two-year suspension or possibly even more as a result of this. It’s been well documented that Silva was pulled from his bout against Kelvin Gastelum at the UFC Fight Night 122 event […]

The post Anderson Silva Continues To Blame Tainted Supplements For Failed Drug Test appeared first on LowKickMMA.com.

Former UFC middleweight champion Anderson Silva continues to speak out about his latest failed drug test.

“The Spider” is facing up to a two-year suspension or possibly even more as a result of this.

It’s been well documented that Silva was pulled from his bout against Kelvin Gastelum at the UFC Fight Night 122 event after he was flagged due to a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) violation.

He tested positive for two banned substances, which were methyltestosterone and a diuretic. Those samples were collected back on October 26. It should be noted that Methyltestosterone is considered a synthetic anabolic steroid.

Silva tested positive for the steroids drostanolone and androsterone in 2015. He blamed his first failed drug test on a Thai sex drug. As a result, he was on the sidelines for one year.

Silva told TMZ Sports on Tuesday (transcript courtesy of MMA Fighting) that his latest failed drug test could be blamed on tainted supplements.

“Maybe the supplements I’m using are contaminated,” Silva told TMZ. “I don’t know. I’m just waiting. Because obviously if I take these steroids, I’m stupid. I’m too old. I’m not at the start of my career. I’m [at the] finish.”

Silva ignited public imagination with talks of a super fight with Roy Jones Jr a few years ago. This was before UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor ever decided to make the jump and fight Floyd Mayweather.

Silva first called for a boxing match with Jones Jr. back in 2009. At the time, Silva was in the middle of his dominant title run.

“I’m just waiting for USADA and my lawyers,” Silva said. “And hopefully they came back soon for fight for Roy Jones. That’s my dream,” Silva said. “Hopefully, this fight comes.”

“A lot of people are talking about that,” Silva said. “But it’s difficult. It’s easy for talk for doctors about that. Sometimes the athlete using the different supplements, because the rules are not easy. It changes all the time.”

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Anderson Silva Talks Tainted Supplements & Roy Jones Jr. Bout

Anderson Silva is hoping to be freed from the clutches of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA). Silva was popped for banned substances ahead of his scheduled UFC Shanghai bout with Kelvin Gastelum. Silva ended up being replaced by Michael Bisping. &#822…

Anderson Silva is hoping to be freed from the clutches of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA). Silva was popped for banned substances ahead of his scheduled UFC Shanghai bout with Kelvin Gastelum. Silva ended up being replaced by Michael Bisping. “The Spider” faces four years and possibly even more if USADA brings the hammer down […]

Anderson Silva Says Failed Drug Test Due to Contaminated Supplements

UFC star Anderson Silva said he didn’t knowingly use the two substances flagged by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency during a drug test last October. 
Silva told TMZ Sports his lawyers are evaluating the veracity of the positive test with USADA in the h…

UFC star Anderson Silva said he didn’t knowingly use the two substances flagged by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency during a drug test last October. 

Silva told TMZ Sports his lawyers are evaluating the veracity of the positive test with USADA in the hope of invalidating the results. He added that “maybe the supplements I’m using are contaminated.”

USADA administrators originally collected the sample during an out-of-competition test in October, with the results coming back in November.

Although Silva hasn’t been formally suspended, the positive test forced UFC to drop him from his main event fight against Kelvin Gastelum at UFC Fight Night 122. Michael Bisping replaced him and lost to Gastelum via first-round knockout.

MMA Fighting’s Marc Raimondi reported earlier this month Silva tested positive for methyltestosterone and an unknown diuretic. Methyltestosterone is listed as an anabolic agent in the 2018 guide of banned substances for the World Anti-Doping Agency.

The Nevada State Athletic Commission issued a one-year suspension to Silva in August 2015 after he failed multiple drug tests. Raimondi cited Brazilian media outlet Combate in reporting Silva’s representatives are attempting to have USADA ignore his 2015 suspension before making a final decision.

According to Raimondi, Silva could potentially face a four-year ban if USADA’s ruling factors in his previous infractions.

Read more MMA news on BleacherReport.com

Biggest Breakthrough Performances from UFC Champions

Just because you become a UFC champion doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get love and attention.
Time and again, it’s been proved that there is a certain blend of results, charisma and good old-fashioned elbow grease required to turn a mixed martial ar…

Just because you become a UFC champion doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get love and attention.

Time and again, it’s been proved that there is a certain blend of results, charisma and good old-fashioned elbow grease required to turn a mixed martial artist into a bona fide star, and holding a world title may not even enter into the equation.

There have, in fact, been many instances where UFC champions broke through after winning a title or even after holding on to it for a while.

They’ll be unknown or underappreciated and then bam!—a stunning KO or fight of the year, and everyone knows who they are.

Here are five such times a UFC champ enjoyed a breakthrough performance.

     

5. Daniel Cormier Stops Volkan Oezdemir, UFC 220

It remains to be seen just how big of a breakthrough Daniel Cormier’s performance at UFC 220 will be, but there’s no question that it looks massive in the immediate aftermath of the event.

It was the first time the light heavyweight champion seemed to get his due with fans, an unusual and refreshing occasion on which questions about Jon Jones weren’t always the first ones he had to answer on fight week.

In the bout itself, Cormier demolished Oezdemir, throwing strikes with incredible ruthlessness and conviction before identifying the skill discrepancy between them on the ground and taking the fight there to finish it. It was a borderline flawless performance, buoyed in its entirety by the fans in the stadium screaming for him the entire time.

And in the aftermath? Cormier was offered a fight with heavyweight champion Stipe Miocic, to which he quickly agreed. The two will meet at UFC 226 in July.

It was the culmination of a career built on hard work, and if UFC 220 is taken as evidence, it’s a culmination that came out of the breakthrough that happened there.

     

4. Demetrious Johnson Taps Ray Borg with Ridiculous Armbar, UFC 216

The build of Demetrious Johnson has been slow and often painful. While the UFC gave him opportunities on network television and at the top of pay-per-views, fans simply were not interested in watching one of the best ever ply his trade.

He was frustrated, bickering with UFC President Dana White and offering befuddlement at the situation more broadly, but it remained somewhat of a hopeless endeavor to get him noticed.

Until it wasn’t.

Somewhere over the months of hopelessness, indifference was slowly replaced with appreciation. Silence turned to cheers when Johnson would show up at live events, people began to acknowledge his excellence in lording over the flyweight class and even his Twitch stream became a topic of discussion.

Riding that wave of momentum, Johnson headed to UFC 216 to defend his title against Ray Borg. Borg, for all his gameness, was no match for the champion, and by the fifth round, it was obvious a win was in the bag for Mighty Mouse.

Instead of riding the remaining time to a decision, though, Johnson, standing with back control, gut-wrenched Borg into the air, caught him in an armbar position while he was there and finished the submission when he hit the ground.

It was about as outrageous a finish as you’ll ever see in MMA, and it was also the type of shareable, GIF-able, unavoidable act that turns a man into a star overnight.

Johnson looks like he’ll now parlay that into a champion versus champion bout against 135-pound kingpin TJ Dillashaw this summer, a showcase that will only raise his newfound profile further.

     

3. Chuck Liddell Knocks Out Randy Couture, UFC 57

For modern UFC fans, it’s a given that Chuck Liddell is a UFC icon. He had the haircut, the modernized Fu Manchu mustache, the tattoos and the results to warrant such a status.

But there was a time when his legend was not so apparent, when his place in the sport was not so guaranteed.

Despite his friendship with UFC ownership and a good run in the promotion throughout the early 2000s, it wasn’t until he threw down with Randy Couture that he really became a big name. His drawn-out feud with Tito Ortiz, and the subsequent beating he laid in the fight, got the attention of hardcore fans, but it was Couture that launched him to stardom.

Couture stopped Liddell in their first meeting in 2003, winning the interim light heavyweight title in the process. Liddell returned the favor in 2005, winning by knockout. UFC 57 was their trilogy bout, one that sold 400,000 pay-per-views and cleared $3 million at the gate, per Wrestling Observer Newsletter‘s Dave Meltzer and MMAPayout.com, massive numbers for the promotion at the time.

Liddell won by knockout again, and from there he was on his way to superstardom. His next fight sold 500,000 units on pay-per-view, and the one after that, a rematch with Ortiz, was the first fight in UFC history to clear one million buys.

It was the third Couture bout that served as the springboard to it all.

     

2. Anderson Silva Front-Kicks Vitor Belfort, UFC 126

It’s hard to imagine there was a time when Anderson Silva wasn’t a superstar. Even now, with some pretty curious performance-enhancing-drug occurrences floating around his name these days, there’s no denying his place in the record books or the incredible things he’s done in the sport.

He even says, going on 43-years-old and facing down a potential suspension, that he’s not done fighting.

But not that long ago, he was having a hard time getting anyone to pay attention to what he was saying. Despite his explosive, jaw-dropping record of domination, people were simply not that engaged with the enigmatic Brazilian.

Then came Super Bowl weekend in 2011, where he headlined UFC 126 against Brazilian icon Vitor Belfort. At that time it was Belfort who was the hero in his country, and he went hard at Silva in the leadup to their meeting in the cage.

It led to the type of tension that had largely been absent in Silva’s career, save for his memorable first bout with Chael Sonnen, which had happened months earlier. Silva won that fight with a Hail Mary submission in the fifth round, and against Belfort, he turned up the drama again—albeit differently, more swiftly.

After three intense minutes of feeling out interspersed with short explosions of offense, Silva and Belfort came to the center of the cage. A slight shoulder feint to get into range and then, almost totally out of nowhere and for the first time in UFC history, Silva landed a front kick flush on the chin of his opponent.

Belfort crumbled and Silva followed up with a couple of shots on the ground, but it was academic at that point.

It was the kick heard ’round the world, and it catapulted Silva into global recognition.

     

1. Conor McGregor Uses Boxing to Become a Global Force, Mayweather vs. McGregor

There’s a real case to be made that the biggest example of a UFC champion having a breakthrough performance didn’t even come in the UFC. It didn’t even come in MMA. In fact, as of today, the sitting champion who broke through might not even be an active mixed martial artist.

For better or worse, who other than Conor McGregor could create such a situation?

McGregor’s path is lore at this point: Blazed his way to the UFC featherweight title, never defended it and was eventually stripped; won the lightweight title in his UFC debut at the weight, never defended it and may or may not have been stripped.

The biggest sticking point in his lightweight run was a boxing match against all-time great Floyd Mayweather Jr. Without a pro boxing match on his resume, McGregor agreed to box the then-retired Mayweather in the summer of 2017, a bout Mayweather won to move to 50-0 in his career.

However, even in defeat, McGregor’s name became bigger than ever. He went from the biggest star in MMA to one of the biggest stars in professional sports, and he went from a professional athlete to a full-on brand.

Sure, there have been some snaps of him back in the gym more recently, but much of his time since Mayweather has been spent living the high life with celebrities and designers, hawking whiskey, riding in private jets and doing anything but fighting.

And people are paying attention.

He has over 20 million followers on Instagram, apparently cleared $100 million for his work against Mayweather, had a movie made about him and might very well never take a UFC fight again.

It’s amazing to think, but the biggest breakthrough by a UFC champion that the sport has seen might have broken him so far through that the sport will never see him again.

     

Follow me on Twitter @matthewjryder!

Read more MMA news on BleacherReport.com

Anderson Silva: Making Sense of UFC Great’s Legacy After 2nd Failed Drug Test

Anderson Silva’s fighting career—at least as we know it—may already be over.
Details of Silva’s second failed drug test emerged this week, casting his future into peril. The former UFC middleweight champion faces a possible four-year ban af…

Anderson Silva‘s fighting career—at least as we know it—may already be over.

Details of Silva’s second failed drug test emerged this week, casting his future into peril. The former UFC middleweight champion faces a possible four-year ban after turning up positive for synthetic testosterone and a banned diuretic in a sample collected in October 2017.

His reps are apparently asking for a lighter sentence, arguing that Silva’s first test failures—for a pair of steroids in January 2015—didn’t fall under the auspices of the UFC’s current anti-doping policy and therefore shouldn’t count against him, according to Combate (h/t MMA Fighting’s Marc Raimondi). Silva, who initially denied knowingly taking performance enhancers, remained mum this week.

Even before this latest drug scandal, things had gotten pretty bleak for a guy once regarded as the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world.

Just 1-4-1 dating back to the loss of his title to Chris Weidman at UFC 162 in July 2013, Silva’s positive test knocked him out of a proposed fight against Kelvin Gastelum at UFC Fight Night 122. Not only was that bout scheduled to air exclusively on the UFC’s digital subscription service instead of pay-per-view, but the once-mighty Silva was a slight underdog to the up-and-coming Gastelum, per BookMaker.

Already 42 years old, any sort of significant suspension would likely be a death sentence for The Spider as an active fighter, at least in America. If this truly is the end of the road for one of the UFC’s greatest champions, how will the sport ultimately look upon his legacy?

Here, Bleacher Report lead MMA writers Chad Dundas (that’s me) and Jonathan Snowden try to sort it out.


Chad: Very few people seem to be able to find it in their hearts to offer a charitable view of Silva’s career at the moment, Jonathan. Former middleweight champion Michael Bisping—who beat Silva by unanimous decision in February 2016 and then replaced him in the fight against Gastelum in late 2017—said his drug test failures “completely destroy his legacy” during a media conference call prior to UFN 122.

Meanwhile, MMA Fighting’s Dave Doyle wrote Saturday that Silva had “disqualified himself” from consideration as greatest of all time and former foe Weidman told Raimondi that a second failed test “definitely tarnishes his legacy” and that his “whole career is in question.”

Former UFC color commentator and middleweight contender Brian Stann was slightly more bullish during a recent appearance with RJ Clifford and Ricky Bones on SiriusXM’s Fight Club.

“He’s still one of the best to ever do it,” Stann said. “In my eyes, there was a clear steroid era of this sport, and he was the best at it during that time. … I wish he would have retired sooner.”

Personally, I’m a bit torn. Silva ruled the 185-pound division with an iron fist from 2006-2013, amassing 10 successful title defenses while three times traveling up to light heavyweight to make mincemeat of larger competitors like James Irvin, Forrest Griffin and Stephan Bonnar.

Frankly, we’ve never seen anybody match that for sheer dominance.

His drug test failures came during the twilight of his 20-year MMA career, after he was into his late 30s/early 40s and had suffered a potentially career-ending leg injury against Weidman in their rematch at UFC 168.

So, if you told me that Silva turned to performance-enhancing drugs only as a beleaguered elder statesman, just trying to keep his battered body going and stay on pace with a new generation of fighters, I might believe it.

But part of me also agrees with guys like Stann and Weidman, in that multiple failed tests is enough for me to suspect Silva’s entire amazing body of work was built while operating outside the rules. Even if the bulk of that run took place during Stann’s so-called “steroid era,” for me it adds a mental asterisk. I can’t bring myself to consider him on par with other all-timers who haven’t tested positive for PEDs.


What say you?

Jonathan: This is a very complicated issue, one that inspires strong feelings on both ends of the spectrum.

Part of me agrees with cynics who believe all athletes seek advantages over their competitors and robust drug testing merely turns athletics into a chemical arms race. Why not, the argument goes, allow controlled use of performance-enhancing drugs, under a doctor’s care, and improve the capabilities of fighters across the board? After all, isn’t enhanced performance a good thing? If Silva was able to kick Vitor Belfort in the head because of drug use, well, he needs to share a little of the good stuff with others. He was the most dynamic fighter in the sport, a walking advertisement for PEDs if that’s what made it all possible.

Then again, PEDs can have serious consequences to long-term health, some of which may be unknown while the athlete is actively using them. And lines, even in a free-for-all, have to be drawn somewhere. When lives and livelihoods are at stake, athletes will make poor decisions about what to put in their bodies. We need regulation, and knowing that, why not play it safe and prohibit all substances that are potentially harmful to the human body? Better, this argument goes, safe than sorry (NSFW language in tweet).

Stann is right and wrong about the “steroid era.” UFC fighters have been subject to testing since 2002, when Nevada became the first state to do a post-fight screening (and also became the first state to catch a champion, when new heavyweight kingpin Josh Barnett popped hot that very night). For years, the UFC and state regulators met in the middle, testing only on the night of the fight. This eliminated the most egregious abuses while leaving months for a fighter to serve as a petri dish, building muscle and increasing recovery time in between fights. This seemed to work pretty well for everyone—at least everyone willing to cut corners when the hall monitor wasn’t watching.

This is the environment Silva came up in. He was subject to drug testing at each of his UFC fights. While we can’t say for certain he wasn’t abusing PEDs in his prime, we can say for sure he was never caught.

Testing under USADA is much more robust. While it’s still possible to get away with using drugs, especially expensive ones that clear your system quickly, it’s also much easier to get caught red-handed. Silva, clearly, is regularly reaching into the cookie jar. This is likely going to be the case for many fighters who came up in his era. As we learned during the testosterone replacement era of MMA, once you start using exogenous testosterone, it’s very difficult to stop.

The truth is, many of our heroes have been busted for PED use of various kinds. From Royce Gracie to Jon Jones, there is no MMA history if we erase the names of all the abusers from the books. Insert an asterisk if you must—but I say the man’s accomplishments stand.

Is my heart too soft to give him the scolding he may very well deserve? Am I going too easy on him, Chad?

Chad: No, that all seems reasonable to me. I also suspect that as more time passes and the memories of Silva’s test failures aren’t so fresh, it will be easier to look back on his many talents and enjoy their pure artistry.

Legacy-wise, you can’t merely write the guy out of the history books. He was too good and too important for too long—and as you pointed out, if you eliminate PED users from the story of MMA, there won’t be much of a story left to tell.

Instead, I favor a warts-and-all approach to honoring Silva’s accomplishments. We can marvel at the win streak, the skills and the terror he inspired in the opposition while still noting that he tested positive twice late in his career. We can still note that, like so many others, he likely overstayed his welcome.

Even though the implementation of the UFC’s revamped anti-doping policy hasn’t been perfect, I remain convinced we need aggressive, state-of-the-art drug testing in this sport. You mentioned the athlete health and safety concerns that must dominate nearly any discussion in combat sports. Any other approach wouldn’t be fair to fighters who want to do it cleanly while still competing at the highest level of the sport.

I shudder at the notion of MMA with no PED regulation. For me, it brings up dystopian visions where doping doctors are just as important and influential as top coaches and where the divide between haves and have-nots is even wider than it is today.

But I digress.

For Silva, I think it will be important to recognize his great abilities inside the cage while also noting his very human flaws. That’s about all you can ask of any athlete in the modern era.

One thing I wonder about is where he goes from here. While I support the UFC’s testing efforts, I also balk at the notion that the company can essentially impose a lifetime ban on an independent contractor who might still need to make a living.

If Silva is handed a lengthy ban in America and instead of calling it quits, he turns up in Japan, I’m not sure how I’ll feel.

On one hand, more power to the guy for still being able to make a buck. On the other hand, as he forges toward his mid-40s, it’ll be tough to watch a reduced version of him continue to risk his future health for short-term gain.

It’s an uneasy feeling I’m growing scarily accustomed to as an MMA fan in 2018.

Read more MMA news on BleacherReport.com

Former Champ Says Anderson Silva Has ‘Definitely’ Tarnished His Legacy

Last week many longtime MMA fans were disappointed to see that longtime former UFC middleweight champion Anderson Silva was facing some serious drug charges that could end his decorated career. Reported to have failed a USADA drug test for synthetic testosterone and a banned diuretic prior to his scheduled UFC Shanghai headliner against Kelvin Gastelum […]

The post Former Champ Says Anderson Silva Has ‘Definitely’ Tarnished His Legacy appeared first on LowKickMMA.com.

Last week many longtime MMA fans were disappointed to see that longtime former UFC middleweight champion Anderson Silva was facing some serious drug charges that could end his decorated career.

Reported to have failed a USADA drug test for synthetic testosterone and a banned diuretic prior to his scheduled UFC Shanghai headliner against Kelvin Gastelum last November, Silva and his team initially claimed a tainted supplement. But with that avenue not working all too well for Silva’s first failed drug test following his UFC 183 bout with Nick Diaz, his latest and more serious failure could spell the end of the legendary ‘Spider.’

His status as a legend could understandably be brought into question, too, and the man who took Silva’s title at UFC 162 believes it has. Speaking up during a recent interview with MMA Fighting, former UFC champion Chris Weidman offered his opinion that Silva had already tarnished his historic legacy:

“Yeah, it definitely tarnishes his legacy. You fail a drug test, your whole career is in question, in my opinion. And he failed them now twice. So definitely it tarnishes his legacy. I don’t know what else to say about that. It’s just another one bites the dust. It’s one after another. Literally almost every guy I ever fought at this point has failed a drug test.”

And to him, it wasn’t all that surprising, as Silva is getting older and steroids are supposedly easier to get in Brazil, according to Weidman.

With past bouts against Brazilian legends Silva, Lyoto Machida, and Vitor Belfort in addition to Yoel Romero and Tom Lawlor, the former champ admitted that almost all of his past opponents had failed drug tests:

“I’m not really that surprised,” Weidman said. “After the first one and now this one. He’s older now. I don’t know. I’m not super surprised. In Brazil, I know the steroids are very easy to get. A lot of guys were probably on them a long time. I’m not super surprised. The reality is that it definitely tarnishes his legacy.

“All these guys are on it. Even Lyoto Machida failed a drug test. I didn’t think he was that guy. All the guys — Yoel Romero, Vitor Belfort. Go on Sherdog and look at my record. Literally almost every single guy I ever fought has failed a drug test.”

Snapping a three-fight slid in his last bout against Gastelum last July, Weidman is now recovering from yet another surgery, this time on his thumb, and expects to be returning to the cage sometime in the early summer.

As for Silva, well, the drug tests that his greatest rival said have tainted his legacy may also put an end to it.

The post Former Champ Says Anderson Silva Has ‘Definitely’ Tarnished His Legacy appeared first on LowKickMMA.com.